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Author Topic: Possible hip replacement  (Read 2815 times)
Swole0565
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« on: September 05, 2006, 04:56:17 PM »

I just found out that I have a degenerative hip that has resulted in considerable bone on bone contact.  I am being scheduled to see an orthopedic Dr to discuss my treatment options.

I am almost certain that replacement surgery will be recommended. 
My questions are....
What type of experiences has anyone had with this procedure?
What time frame for rehab?
How were your workouts effected, post-op?

Thanks
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Princess L
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2006, 08:16:29 PM »

How old are you?  Unfortuately, they only last 10-15 years, but fortunately, if you're young, the recovery  and healing shouldn't be too horrific (unlike the procedure itself  Shocked )   Plan on a significant amount of atrophy on the side that is replaced.  Therfore, it wouldn't be a bad idea to build up your legs and glutes as much as possible before going in - if that's even possible  Huh  You might be in too much pain as it is to do that. 

Probably 3-6 months for recovery and about a year to work up into heavier loads.  The lack of pain will be very inspirational tho.  Single legged movements (squats, presses, exensions, X-band walks) will help the recovery and strength building process.  Loading the spine will be out of the question for a long time.
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Swole0565
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« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2006, 09:42:13 PM »

Thanks for your reply.  I am 41yrs old.  Thankfully, my legs are quick to respond to training and have been one of my better bodyparts.

What exactly did you mean by, "Loading the spine will be outta the question for a long time?"

Thanks again
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Princess L
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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2006, 05:56:01 PM »


What exactly did you mean by, "Loading the spine will be outta the question for a long time?"

Thanks again

Namely conventional squats.  Don't worry, there are plenty of modifications that can be made.
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Psychophysio
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2006, 11:48:13 AM »

Immediately after surgery you are not allowed to flex your hip past 90 degrees, no aduction (crossing your legs) and no rotation. This is so you don't dislocate the prosthesis. We usually get people out of bed day 1 post-op (depending on if you needed a blood transfusion) and people go home from the hospital by day 3-7 depending on thier mobility. When you leave you should be independent with crutches on stairs and on the flat. Some people are full weight bearing and some are partial, depending on the surgeon's preference. If you are FWB you won't lose as much mass.

Exercises you will be given are hip flexion to 90 degrees, hip abduction and quads exercises. The surgeons usually follow up after 6 weeks to check wound healing etc. By 6 weeks you might be walking with 1 crutch or on your own. If you are generally fit and well, 3-6 months is a good time frame to get back to normal, like Princess L said. You will have to avoid the positions of dislocation though so no squats in the gym. A physio should be able to help you out though with what you can/can't do.

I have seen one guy who was 40 and got his hip done. He had a SUFE when he was young and pins in both hips already. He went home on Day 3 and did very well afterwards. Sometimes a new hip can last upwards of 15 years - it all depends what you do with it. Replacing the individual components is straightforward though  Smiley.
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bicepsforyou
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2006, 08:00:45 AM »

When other therapies fail to provide relief from the pain of a damaged hip, hip replacement may be the answer. Hip replacement called total hip arthroplasty can relieve pain and give you back the range of motion you need to go about your daily tasks. But hip replacement surgery isn't without risks. Find out what to expect from hip replacement surgery and weigh the benefits and risks to decide if it's right for you.

Who is hip replacement for?
Hip replacement is usually considered once other therapies, such as pain medications, have failed. Most people undergo hip replacement as a result of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. But you might also consider hip replacement if you experience severe pain, loss of motion or deformity of your hip joint. Hip replacement is also used in people with hip injuries, rheumatoid arthritis and other medical conditions, such as a bone tumor or bone loss due to insufficient blood supply (avascular necrosis).

You might want to ask your doctor about the possibility of hip replacement if you frequently experience any of the following:

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« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2006, 06:39:00 PM »

Go on Clarence Bass's site.  He had hip replacement.  It was done with the newest and least invasive technique. I think the site is cbass.com.  Sometimes I wonder if squats are bad for the hip joint.  I think Paul Anderson and John Grimek both had hip replacement.  Anderson squatted around 1200 pounds. Grimek competed in the Olympics in weightlifting in 1936 I believe.  He was also the only 2 time AAU Mr. America.  After him they said you can only win once. Grimek squatted heavy weights well into his 70;s.I often wonder if heavy squats accelerate the wear and tear on the joint.  I have hip pain at 47 and I have been squatting since I was around 13.  I noticed with a bad hip that leg presses don't bother it all.  Squatting machines like Powertec and Tuffstuff don't seem to aggravate the joint either.   
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Swole0565
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« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2006, 07:05:00 PM »

Thanks for all the great responses.  To update, my orthopedic gave me a cortizone injection, into the bad hip joint.  His thoughts are that at this stage, if the injections will "manage" the pain for 2-3 months, I can repeat the procedure and prolong the need for the replacement surgery.

Any thoughts on this treatment and/or the theory behind it?
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deadliftjeff
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« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2008, 07:31:11 PM »

Hey, I'm right there with you on this..I found out last week...my doc says my rt hip is like that of a 76 yr old...I'm only 46 yrsd old but have been powerlifting for 30 yrs already.....a new hip socket insert and ball insert is the way to go. I'm not scheduling this anytime soon but,....doc says within 5 yrs, much less if I continue lifting....the problem is that I can't get squat depth on the right side...plus there is shear agony getting up after I sit for more than 10 minutes. I'm researching it now and seeing what all the options are....that surgery is last on my list..if it means laying off a year; so be it.....I should have done that before. Ricky Crain had his rt hip replaced in the summer of 2006....he says he;s just over 500 lbs now on his squats; that's encouraging; of course he was about a 750-800 lb squatter. There's a guy in the last issue of Poerlifting USA page 88, 54 yrs old says he deadlifted 523 lbs 10 months after hip replacement....that's encouraging too. Stay away from cortisone...it's just a mask and will in most cases accelerate the issue by breaking down tissue. Visit www.usapowerlifting.com; Committees/Medical...then Dr Mike Hartle article...pretty much spells it out. keep in touch   deadliftjeff
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