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« Reply #275 on: April 19, 2017, 05:44:54 PM »

 Grin

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« Reply #276 on: April 24, 2017, 06:38:11 PM »

Trump Awards Purple Heart at Walter Reed Military Hospital

Image: Trump Awards Purple Heart at Walter Reed Military Hospital
(AP)
Saturday, 22 Apr 2017

President Donald Trump on Saturday awarded a Purple Heart to an Army sergeant recently wounded in Afghanistan.

"When I heard about this and I wanted to do it myself," Trump said during a brief ceremony at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, outside Washington. He awarded the medal to Sgt. 1st Class Alvaro Barrientos, who was wounded in Afghanistan on March 17. The White House did not release Barrientos' hometown.

It was Trump's first visit as president to the military hospital. He was joined by his wife, first lady Melania Trump.

Barrientos, whose right leg below the knee had been amputated, was wheeled into a hospital atrium in a wheelchair, accompanied by his wife, Tammy.

Trump, who is also commander of the U.S. military, kissed Barrientos' wife before pinning the medal on the sergeant's left shirt collar. The Purple Heart is awarded to service members who are wounded or killed in action.

Besides Barrientos, Trump was expected to meet privately with about a dozen service members who are receiving care at the medical center.

Before leaving the White House, the president tweeted that he looked forward to "seeing our bravest and greatest Americans."

http://www.newsmax.com/Politics/US-Trump-Walter-Reed/2017/04/22/id/785820/
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« Reply #277 on: April 26, 2017, 08:11:59 AM »

Trump Awards Purple Heart at Walter Reed Military Hospital

President Donald Trump on Saturday awarded a Purple Heart to an Army sergeant recently wounded in Afghanistan.

"When I heard about this and I wanted to do it myself," Trump said during a brief ceremony at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, outside Washington. He awarded the medal to Sgt. 1st Class Alvaro Barrientos, who was wounded in Afghanistan on March 17. The White House did not release Barrientos' hometown.

It was Trump's first visit as president to the military hospital. He was joined by his wife, first lady Melania Trump.

Barrientos, whose right leg below the knee had been amputated, was wheeled into a hospital atrium in a wheelchair, accompanied by his wife, Tammy.

Trump, who is also commander of the U.S. military, kissed Barrientos' wife before pinning the medal on the sergeant's left shirt collar. The Purple Heart is awarded to service members who are wounded or killed in action.

Besides Barrientos, Trump was expected to meet privately with about a dozen service members who are receiving care at the medical center.

Before leaving the White House, the president tweeted that he looked forward to "seeing our bravest and greatest Americans."

http://www.newsmax.com/Politics/US-Trump-Walter-Reed/2017/04/22/id/785820/

Seriously, what the fuck?



Trump is getting slammed for saying 'congratulations' to a Purple Heart recipient


 President Donald Trump raised more than a few eyebrows during his first visit as president to Walter Reed National Medical Center on Saturday when he awarded the Purple Heart to Army Sergeant First Class Alvaro Barrientos.

"When I heard about this, I wanted to do it myself," Trump told Barrientos as he placed the Purple Heart on the soldier's lapel. "Congratulations … tremendous."

The medal is given to service members who were wounded or killed in battle.

Many on social media immediately criticized the president’s choice of words to the wounded soldier whose leg had to be amputated after he survived an attack in Afghanistan’s Helmland province.

    Oh...dear.
    Really, believe me, no one seeks a Purple Heart.

    Truly. https://t.co/HXbnVy2S2q   
    — Kim Dozier (@KimDozier) April 22, 2017

    Hey military, y'all would Eat. A. Brother. Alive. If they did this. Whatcha gonna say bout Trump? Hope his staff learns him up right quick. https://t.co/V9z9PVcTzQ   
    — Kevin Baron (@DefenseBaron) April 22, 2017

    Congratulations? Like the Purple Heart is a prize? Trump is an idiot. Most of us always knew this. https://t.co/vf3g4AOA7m   
    — The Tweetwit (@TheTweetwit) April 22, 2017

    @louwho27 It's rather like if Trump signed a condolence card to a widow "congratulations". Not everything we do to mark something is a congratulation.
    — Matthew Chapman (@fawfulfan) April 22, 2017

    @barbarastarrcnn So inappropriate. You don't congratulate a soldier for being wounded. You thank them for their service, dedication and sacrifice.
    — SchoolHouseRockAlum (@HouseOfMichele) April 22, 2017

This isn’t the first time the president has been criticized for remarks he made about the Purple Heart. During the campaign, a veteran gave the then-nominee his Purple heart.

"I always wanted to get the Purple Heart. This was much easier," Trump said at the time.


http://www.businessinsider.com/trump-says-congratulations-to-a-purple-heart-recipient-2017-4
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« Reply #278 on: May 12, 2017, 09:13:55 AM »

Wish I could shake this man's hand.

Oldest known WWII veteran honored at Arlington ceremony
Published November 11, 2013
FoxNews.com


Richard Overton, the oldest living WWII veteran, listens during a Veterans Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.AP

The oldest known veteran of World War II was honored with a thunderous standing ovation during a ceremony Monday at Arlington National Cemetery, as President Obama and the rest of the nation paid tribute to 107-year-old Richard Overton's service.

The tribute to Overton was a stand-out moment at Monday's Veterans Day ceremonies, as details emerged about Overton's visit. Earlier in the day, the Texas man met with Obama and Vice President Biden, along with other veterans, during a White House breakfast.

"This is the life of one American veteran, living proud and strong in the land he helped keep free," Obama said during the ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

Though he uses a wheelchair, Overton can still stand -- and did so, as the crowd applauded his service.

Overton served in the Pacific during World War II, and Obama regaled the audience with his accomplishments. "He was there at Pearl Harbor when the battleships were still smoldering. He was there at Okinawa. He was there at Iwo Jima," Obama said.

When he returned from the war, Overton went back to Texas, where he built a house for him and his wife -- the house he still lives in today. The president said Overton still rakes his own lawn, and still drives ladies in his neighborhood to church every Sunday.

According to a profile on Overton in USA Today, his attendance at Monday's ceremony was set up after Overton visited the World War II Memorial and Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial as part of an Honor Flight Austin trip back in May. Overton reportedly wondered what it would be like to meet the president, and the visit was later arranged.

During the war, Overton was a member of the Army's 188th Aviation Engineer Battalion and reportedly volunteered for service.

He attributes his longevity in part to drinking a tablespoon of whiskey in his coffee and smoking a dozen cigars a day, according to the article.

Obama used his remarks Monday to remind the nation that thousands of service members are still at war in Afghanistan. The war is expected to formally conclude at the end of next year, though the U.S. may keep a small footprint in the country.

As the Afghan war comes to a close, Obama said the nation has a responsibility to ensure that the returning troops are the "best cared-for and best respected veterans in the world." The country's obligations to those who served "endure long after the battle ends," he said.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/11/11/obama-honors-veterans-at-wreath-laying-breakfast/
One of nation’s oldest vets honored on 111th birthday
Associated Press
May 12, 2017


Richard Overton
(Photo: Darren Abate / AP)

Austin, Texas — One of the nation’s oldest veterans has been celebrated by his Texas hometown on his 111th birthday.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler declared Thursday Richard Overton Day in the city and also gave the street he has lived on for the past 45 years the honorary name of Richard Overton Avenue.

While Overton concedes that 111 is “pretty old,” he tells KVUE-TV he still feels good. Overton mentioned that the secret to a long life is smoking cigars and drinking whiskey, two things he continues to indulge in today.

Overton was already in his 30s when he volunteered and served in the Army. He was at Pearl Harbor just after the Japanese attack.

In 2013, he was honored by President Barack Obama at a Veterans Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/nation/2017/05/12/vet-turns-older/101590360/
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« Reply #279 on: August 02, 2017, 01:04:58 PM »

Trump: MoH Recipient 'Gave His All and Then He Just Kept Giving'



President Trump presents the Medal of Honor to former Army Specialist James McCloughan during an East Room ceremony at the White House July 31, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Military.com | 31 Jul 2017 | by Matthew Cox

In his first Medal of Honor ceremony, President Donald Trump presented America's highest valor award today to a Vietnam War Army medic for risking his own life again and again to save his fellow soldiers in a two-day battle that occurred 48 years ago.

Before a White House audience of military officials that included Defense Secretary James Mattis and Army Chief of Staff Mark Milley, Trump gave a solemn talk about the brave actions of Spec. 5 James C. McCloughan.

"Today we pay tribute to a veteran that went above and beyond the call of duty to protect our comrades, our country and our freedom," Trump said.

On May 13, 1969, PFC. McCloughan was serving combat medic with Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Light Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, when his unit air assaulted into an enemy-infested area near Nui Yon Hill.

"As Jim and his men jumped out of the helicopter, it quickly became clear that they were surrounded by enemy troops," Trump said. "Within minutes, two choppers were shot down."

McCloughan sprinted 100 meters in an open field through heavy fire to rescue a comrade too injured to move and carried him to safety, according to the award citation.

That same day, McCloughan's platoon was ordered to search the area near Nui Yon Hill, when the platoon was ambushed by a large North Vietnamese Army force and sustained heavy casualties.

While leading two wounded soldiers into a trench, shrapnel from an enemy rocket propelled grenade tore into McCloughan.

"That terrible wound didn't stop Jim from pulling those two men to safety," Trump said. "Nor did it stop him from answering the call of another wounded soldier and carrying him to safety atop his own badly injured body.

"One of his comrades said 'whoever called medic could immediately count on McCloughan. He's a brave guy.'"

McCloughan ignored a direct order to stay back and braved an enemy assault while moving into the kill zone on four more occasions to extract wounded comrades, the citation states.

Though bleeding heavily from wounds on his head and entire body, he refused evacuation to safety in order to remain at the battle sight with his fellow soldiers, who were heavily outnumbered by the North Vietnamese Army forces, according to the citation.

Trump described the tale. At the end of the first day of fighting, the unit pulled back in a defensive position for the night.

"One soldier's plea Jim could not ignore. Again 'Doc' did not hesitate. He crawled through a rice paddy thick with steel rain -- that means bullets all over the place, Trump said. "As soldiers watched him, they were sure that was the last time they would see Doc. They thought that was the end of their friend Jim.

"But after several minutes passed, Jim emerged from the smoke and fire carrying yet another soldier."

When he lifted the soldier on a medevac helicopter, his lieutenant ordered Jim to get in too.

"'Get in! He said. Get in!' But Jim refused. He said 'you are going to need me here,'" Trump said. "As Jim now says 'I would have rather died on the battlefield then know that men died because they did not have a medic.'"

On May 14, McCloughan's platoon was again ordered to advance. He was wounded a second time by small arms fire and shrapnel from an RPG while helping two wounded soldiers, the citation states.

In the final phases of the attack, two companies from the 2nd North Vietnamese Army Division and an element of 700 soldiers from a Viet Cong regiment descended upon Charlie Company's position on three sides.

McCloughan "went into the crossfire numerous times throughout the battle to extract the wounded soldiers, according to the citation. "His relentless and courageous actions inspired and motivated his comrades to fight for their survival."

When supplies ran low, McCloughan volunteered to hold a blinking strobe light in an open area as a marker for a nighttime resupply drop.

"He remained steadfast while bullets landed all around him and rocket propelled grenades flew over his prone, exposed body," according to the citation. "During the morning darkness of May 15, Private 1st Class McCloughan knocked out a rocket propelled grenade position with a grenade, fought and eliminated enemy soldiers" and treated numerous casualties while organizing medevac helicopter runs.

When McCloughan was growing up, his "dad taught him a simple, but powerful lesson -- never do anything halfway, always do your best. Jim took that lesson very much to heart," Trump said.

"Jim did what his father had taught him. He gave it his all and then he just kept giving. In those 48 hours, Jim rescued 10 American soldiers and tended to countless others," Trump said. "He was one of 32 men who fought until the end. They held their ground against more than 2,000 enemy troops."

In the audience stood 10 of McCloughan's fellow soldiers, five whom McCloughan saved in the battle.

Trump called all of them by first name and thanked them for their sacrifice and service.

"Stand up, wherever you may be. Where are you?" Trump said. Applause filled the room as the men stood. Trump clapped loudly.

Trump hung the Medal of Honor around McCloughan's neck, shook his hand and hugged him.

"For over two centuries, our brave men and women in uniform have overcome tyranny, fascism, communism, and every threat to our freedom. Every single threat, they have overcome," Trump said.

"And we have overcome these threats because of titans like Jim, whose spirit could never be conquered. That's what this this award is, and Jim's life represents so well -- America's unbreakable spirit."

http://www.military.com/daily-news/2017/07/31/trump-moh-recipient-gave-his-all-then-he-just-kept-giving.html?ESRC=army-a_170802.nl
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« Reply #280 on: September 05, 2017, 03:07:54 PM »

Four-year-old Texan welcomes National Guard troops with Old Glory
By Todd Starnes/Twitter

There have been some mighty heartbreaking photographs from the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. But there have also been some mighty heartwarming photographs - images that demonstrate the state of our nation is still strong.

Contrary to what you may see on cable television news or read in the big city newspapers -- we are a united people -- one nation under God.

The other day the National Guard showed up in Richmond, Texas and a four-year-old boy was there to greet troops -- standing in the floodwaters, holding an American flag.

"My little man met some real superheroes this morning," Wes Claburn wrote on Facebook.

The picture of the little patriot has been shared from coast to coast.

"He was simply just showing support to the soldiers that were helping our neighbors," Emily Claburn told the Houston Chronicle. "He also offered to give the soldiers his favorite Grave Digger monster truck to help others with the flood in a time of need. Our son truly has a heart as big as Texas, and we are so blessed."

God bless Texas, America.

My little man met some real super heroes this morning. We are doing great. Still have power and water. Please continue to pray for the people of Houston.

https://www.toddstarnes.com/column/four-year-old-texan-welcomes-national-guard-troops-with-old-glory
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« Reply #281 on: September 05, 2017, 03:38:02 PM »

One of nation’s oldest vets honored on 111th birthday
Associated Press
May 12, 2017


Richard Overton
(Photo: Darren Abate / AP)

Austin, Texas — One of the nation’s oldest veterans has been celebrated by his Texas hometown on his 111th birthday.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler declared Thursday Richard Overton Day in the city and also gave the street he has lived on for the past 45 years the honorary name of Richard Overton Avenue.

While Overton concedes that 111 is “pretty old,” he tells KVUE-TV he still feels good. Overton mentioned that the secret to a long life is smoking cigars and drinking whiskey, two things he continues to indulge in today.

Overton was already in his 30s when he volunteered and served in the Army. He was at Pearl Harbor just after the Japanese attack.

In 2013, he was honored by President Barack Obama at a Veterans Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/nation/2017/05/12/vet-turns-older/101590360/

I love this guy.  Just incredible that he gets around as he does, sharp as a tack, and he's a man who likes his whiskey and cigar and recognizes their value in life.
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« Reply #282 on: September 06, 2017, 09:50:09 AM »

https://memory.loc.gov/diglib/vhp/story/loc.natlib.afc2001001.89813/?loclr=blogflt
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« Reply #283 on: October 04, 2017, 02:38:00 PM »

Hero Marine stole truck, drove Vegas shooting victims to hospital
Fox News

A U.S. Marine vet helped rescue more than a dozen people during the Las Vegas shooting attack Sunday with quick thinking he credited to his military training.

Taylor Winston, 29, stole a utility pickup truck he found on the concert grounds and transported several injured people to the hospital before ambulances could arrive on the scene, The Orange County Register reported.

Winston was reportedly at the concert with his girlfriend and friends when attacker Stephen Paddock began shooting at the crowd from his hotel room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nev., he told CBS News.

Police officers and medical personnel stand at the scene of a shooting near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Las Vegas. Multiple victims were being transported to hospitals after a shooting late Sunday at a music festival on the Las Vegas Strip. (AP Photo/John Locher)  (Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 515 others in the shooting spree.

“The shots got louder and louder, closer to us and saw people getting hit, it was like we could be hit at any second,” Winston said. “It was a mini war zone but we couldn’t fight back.”

The vet said they ran for cover and hopped a fence to get to safety. Once he landed on the other side, he said he reportedly saw a bunch of white trucks.

“I tested my luck to see if any of them had keys in it, first one we tried opening had keys sitting right there,” he said. “I started looking for people to take to the hospital. There was just too many and it was overwhelming how much blood was everywhere.”

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Winston and his friend reportedly made two trips to Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center, squeezing “probably 20 to 30” victims in the backseat and in the bed of the truck, CBS News said. When they returned to the shooting scene for a third pick up, he said it looked like emergency responders had it under control, The Orange County Register reported.

The vet reportedly returned the truck, parking it a few blocks away from the venue.

Winston, who served two tours in Iraq before being honorably discharged from the Marines, said he thought his military training helped him snap into action, CBS News reported.

But he added that there were a lot of “courageous people” on the scene helping each other out and said he was “glad that I could call them my country folk.”

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/03/hero-marine-stole-truck-drove-vegas-shooting-victims-to-hospital.html
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« Reply #284 on: October 05, 2017, 04:15:45 PM »

One of nation’s oldest vets honored on 111th birthday
Associated Press
May 12, 2017


Richard Overton
(Photo: Darren Abate / AP)

Austin, Texas — One of the nation’s oldest veterans has been celebrated by his Texas hometown on his 111th birthday.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler declared Thursday Richard Overton Day in the city and also gave the street he has lived on for the past 45 years the honorary name of Richard Overton Avenue.

While Overton concedes that 111 is “pretty old,” he tells KVUE-TV he still feels good. Overton mentioned that the secret to a long life is smoking cigars and drinking whiskey, two things he continues to indulge in today.

Overton was already in his 30s when he volunteered and served in the Army. He was at Pearl Harbor just after the Japanese attack.

In 2013, he was honored by President Barack Obama at a Veterans Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/nation/2017/05/12/vet-turns-older/101590360/

His great-grandfather was John Overton.
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« Reply #285 on: October 24, 2017, 10:00:43 AM »

Trump Awards Medal of Honor to Vietnam Army Medic

Image: Trump Awards Medal of Honor to Vietnam Army Medic
(Saul Loeb/Getty Images)
By Jason Devaney    |   Monday, 23 Oct 2017

President Donald Trump awarded the Medal of Honor Monday to a retired Army captain who served as a medic during the Vietnam War.

During a ceremony in the East Room of the White House, Trump presented Capt. Gary Michael Rose of Huntsville, Alabama with the nation's highest military decoration.

The 70-year-old Rose was a medic with the 5th Special Forces Group in September 1970 when he risked his life numerous times to help others during a four-day mission called Operation Tailwind. It's believed that Rose saved as many as 70 soldiers as he dodged bullets and pulled them out of the line of fire and out of a crashed helicopter. During the mission, a rocket-propelled grenade exploded near him and left a large wound on his foot, which left him hobbling as he continued to save lives.

Trump spoke about Rose's bravery during the ceremony.

"By the time they reached the base, Mike was covered in blood," Trump said. "He refused treatment until all of his men had been cared for first. In every action during those four days, Mike valiantly fought for the life of his comrades even if it meant the end of his own life.

"Mike … your will to endure, your love for your fellow soldier, your devotion to your country inspires us all."

Rose, who went on to serve another 20 years in the Army after his 1970 heroics, was the second person Trump has awarded the Medal of Honor. In July, Vietnam War Army medic James McCloughan was bestowed the award.

More than 3,500 Medals of Honor have been given out.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/donald-trump-awards-medal-of-honor-vietnam/2017/10/23/id/821598/
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« Reply #286 on: January 11, 2018, 02:44:33 PM »

Senior Pentagon soldier to ISIS: Surrender or get beaten with entrenchment tool
By Lucia I. Suarez Sang   | Fox News

Army Command Sgt. Maj. John Wayne Troxell issued a blunt warning to ISIS militant fighters.  (US Army/Facebook)

The Pentagon's senior enlisted member has drawn the line against ISIS: "surrender or die!"

In a blunt warning to the remaining ISIS fighters, Army Command Sgt. Maj. John Wayne Troxell said the shrinking band of militants could either surrender to the U.S. military or face death.

“ISIS needs to understand that the Joint Force is on orders to annihilate them,” he wrote in a forceful message on Facebook. “So they have two options, should they decide to come up against the United States, our allies and partners: surrender or die!”

Troxell said the U.S.-led military coalition would provide them safety in the form of a detainee cell, food, a bed and due process if they give themselves up.

"If they choose not to surrender, then we will kill them with extreme prejudice...by dropping bombs on them, shooting them in the face, or beating them to death with our entrenching tools."
- Army Command Sgt. Maj. John Wayne Troxell
“However, if they choose not to surrender, then we will kill them with extreme prejudice, whether that be through security force assistance, by dropping bombs on them, shooting them in the face, or beating them to death with our entrenching tools,” he continued. “Regardless, they cannot win, so they need to choose what it’s going to be.”

The post was shared Tuesday evening along with a photo of an entrenchment tool – a collapsible shovel used by the U.S. military. It also included the hashtag #ISIS_SurrenderOrDie.

The Facebook post doesn't appear to be Troxell’s first time warning ISIS about the U.S. military’s intentions with entrenching tools if the terrorists don't give up.

During a stop in Afghanistan on a United Services Organization holiday tour last month, Troxell delivered a speech in which he said ISIS will be “annihilated, period!”
 
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“That may be through advising, assisting and enabling the host-nation partners,” he said in a video recorded by a Stars and Stripes reporter. “It may be by dropping bombs on them. It may be by shooting them in the face. And it even might be beating them to death with your entrenching tool, but we are going to beat this enemy!”

Marine Gen. Joseph R. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Florent Groberg, a Medal of Honor recipient, were in attendance at the event.

As senior enlisted member, Troxell is assigned to serve as a voice for enlisted service members at the Pentagon, the Washington Post reported.

Air Force Col. Patrick Ryder, a spokesman for Dunford and the Joint Staff, told the Post that Troxell’s comments emphasized the U.S.-led coalition’s resolve to defeat ISIS.

“His intent was to communicate the tenacity of the warrior ethos that, even when faced with the brutal and unforgiving nature of combat, will use every resource available to fight and win,” Ryder said of Troxell.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/01/11/senior-pentagon-soldier-to-isis-surrender-or-get-beaten-with-entrenchment-tool.html
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« Reply #287 on: March 30, 2018, 03:22:12 PM »

The incredible career of Jim Mattis, the legendary Marine general turned defense secretary
Ben Brimelow
Jan. 15, 2018



U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Ukraine's Defence Minister Stepan Poltorak walk past honour guards during a welcoming ceremony in Kiev, Ukraine August 24, 2017. Gleb Garanich/Reuters

Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis has achieved a legendary status on par with the heroes of the US Military's past.

Stories of his achievements and sayings are told in the same way that Patton, Pershing, Marshall, and MacArthur. He is widely viewed as above politics — a man dedicated to his job and his country.

In his 44 years of service, Mattis rose through the ranks of the military to the very top. He has received numerous colorful nicknames — most notably "Mad Dog" and "Warrior Monk" — and made a number of memorable statements that will likely be quoted by service members for a long time to come.

Take a look at the life and career of the Warrior Monk:

James Norman Mattis was born September 8, 1950, in Pullman, Washington.


U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Mattis enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Reserves when he was 18 years old in 1969. He was commissioned a second lieutenant after graduating from Central Washington University with a history degree in 1971.

Mattis enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Reserves when he was 18 years old in 1969. He was commissioned a second lieutenant after graduating from Central Washington University with a history degree in 1971.


United States Marine General James N. Mattis at the American military compound at Kandahar Airport January 14, 2002 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Mario Tama/Getty Images

Mattis saw his first action as a lieutenant colonel in Operation Desert Shield in 1990.


The Battle plan for southern Kuwait during Operation Desert Storm. The First Marine Division, which Mattis' unit was apart of, is second from the right. Wikimedia commons

Then-lieutenant colonel Mattis lead the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines (the same unit as legendary Marine Lewis "Chesty" Puller) during combat operations for the liberation of Kuwait from Saddam Hussein.

Then-lieutenant colonel Mattis lead the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines (the same unit as legendary Marine Lewis


US Marine armored vehicles kick up a storm of sand as they make their way through the Saudi Arabian desert , Jan. 20, 1991. Associated Press/Laurent Rebours

Dubbed "Task Force Ripper," the unit led the First Marine Division straight into Kuwait City, and took part in the Battle of Kuwait International Airport.


Tom Brokow interviews Lt. Col. Jim Mattis during Operation Desert Shield, August 21, 1990. Screenshot via YouTube
Mattis was promoted to colonel, then brigadier general, and eventually became involved in the early planning and fighting of the Afghanistan War following 9/11.


Brigadier General James Mattis talks with Marines of the 15th and 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit prior to their departing in a 40 plus vehicle convoy from a staging area to take control of the airfield in Kandahar, Afghanistan, December 14, 2001. Associated Press

Under the call sign "CHAOS," an acronym for "Colonel Has An Outstanding Solution," Mattis took a direct approach in combat, and fought on the frontlines on southern Afghanistan with his Marines.
Under the call sign


Brig. Gen. James Mattis carries his packs into the Kandahar International Airport, which he was responsible for taking over, Kandahar, Afghanistan, December 14, 2001. Associated Press

In 2005, he made controversial statements about his time in Afghanistan:


Brig. Gen. James Mattis talks with his officers of the 15th and 26th Marine Expeditionary Units during a briefing at Kandahar airport, part of Camp Rhino, December 12, 2001. Associated Press

"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn't wear a veil. You know, guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a hell of a lot of fun to shoot them. Actually it's quite fun to fight them, you know. It's a hell of a hoot. It's fun to shoot some people. I'll be right up there with you. I like brawling."

Major General Mattis was in charge of the entire First Marine Division during the invasion of Iraq in 2003 — commanding some 20,000 Marines.


Maj. Gen Jim Mattis answers questions at a news conference at the Division 1 main headquarters outside of Baghdad Tuesday, April 8, 2003. Associated Press

Mattis made sure that his Marines achieved their tasks swiftly. When one of his subordinates stalled the Marines' advance at the Battle of Nasiriyah, Mattis relieved him of command and, in an emphatic move, forced him to empty his sidearm of ammunition.


U.S. Marines from the 15th Expeditionary Unit make their way in the desert near the southern city of Nasiriyah, Iraq, March 30, 2003. Associated Press

Mattis was a key actor in the first and second Battles of Fallujah, some of the bloodiest actions in the war.

US Marines try to push into the center of Fallujah, Iraq, November 12, 2004. Associated Press

The "Mad Dog's" mission in Iraq continued well past 2003, as he was involved in the stabilization campaign.

via Dvidshub

After the invasion, Mattis sent the First Marine Division's tanks and artillery back to the US. He then told Iraqi military leaders in a meeting: "I come in peace. I didn't bring artillery. But I'm pleading with you, with tears in my eyes: If you f--- with me, I'll kill you all."

After the invasion, Mattis sent the First Marine Division's tanks and artillery back to the US. He then told Iraqi military leaders in a meeting:
Mattis speaks to the media in Fallujah, Iraqi Wednesday April 14, 2004. Associated Press



Later on, Mattis said something similar: "We've backed off in good faith to try and give you a chance to straighten this problem out. But I am going to beg with you for a minute. I'm going to plead with you, do not cross us. Because if you do, the survivors will write about what we do here for 10,000 years."


Later on, Mattis said something similar:
US Marine Corps

General Mattis became the source of words to live by in the military.


Retired US Marine Corps four-star Gen. James Mattis. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
Here's some of his most notable phrases:

"Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet."

"The most important six inches on the battlefield is between your ears."

"Don't create more enemies than you take out by some immoral act."

"You cannot allow any of your people to avoid the brutal facts. If they start living in a dream world, it's going to be bad."

And a rather odd one: "Powerpoint makes us stupid."

Mattis then held other high-level roles, like NATO's Supreme Allied Commander for Transformation, commander of U.S. Joint Forces Command, and the Commander of United States Central Command.

Mattis then held other high-level roles, like NATO's Supreme Allied Commander for Transformation, commander of U.S. Joint Forces Command, and the Commander of United States Central Command.


Mattis as NATO's Supreme Allied Commander Transformation Wikimedia commons
Mattis' commands saw him take direct charge over a number of different operations:

As NATO's Supreme Allied Commander for Transformation, he was tasked with implementing new standards, tactics, and concepts into the Alliance's militaries. He had similar tasks as commander of US Joint Forces Command — though only for the US Military's five branches.

As Commander of United States Central Command (USCC), he oversaw operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as parts of Syria, Iran, and Yemen.

The Obama White House apparently did not place much trust in Mattis, believing him to be too hawkish, especially on Iran. Nevertheless, he served as Commander of USCC until his retirement in 2013.

Just three years after retirement, Mattis became secretary of defense.


Donald Trump at a rally with James Mattis, his pick for defense secretary. AP
General Mattis was newly elected President Donald Trump's candidate to lead the Defense Department. He was confirmed in the Senate by a vote of 98-1.


As secretary of defense, Mattis has focused his efforts on the fight against ISIS, the nuclear threat from North Korea, and stabilizing Afghanistan.

South Korea's Defence Minister Han Min-koo shows U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Japan's Defence Minister Tomomi Inada how to do a handshake during a trilateral meeting on the sidelines of the 16th IISS Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore June 3, 2017. REUTERS/Edgar Su

He has frequently allied himself with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.


Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson arrive to brief the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the ongoing fight against the Islamic State on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., August 2, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

He often seems to care little for politics. During a visit to troops stationed overseas, he told soldiers to "hold the line until our country gets back to understanding and respecting each other and showing it.”



He often seems to care little for politics. During a visit to troops stationed overseas, he told soldiers to
Secretary of Defense James Mattis Yuri Gripas/Reuters

His time in Washington has not eroded his wit or attitude:

Secretary Mattis during his interview with "Face the Nation." NTK Network/YouTube
In an interview on CBS "Face The Nation," host John Dickerson asked, "What keeps you awake at night?"

The Mad Dog responded almost instantly and in true Mattis fashion:

"Nothing. I keep other people awake at night."

Mattis has become an icon, as this photo that was posted by the Marine Corps Special Operations Command official Facebook shows:

Reddit
The image also had this written under it:

Hail Mattis.

Full of hate.

Our troops stand with thee.

Blessed art thou among enlisted.

And blessed is the fruit of thy knife hand.

Holy Mattis, father of War,

Pray for us heathen

Now and at the hour of combat.

Amen.

http://www.businessinsider.com/james-mattis-defense-secretary-career-biography-2018-1
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« Reply #288 on: April 02, 2018, 03:49:49 PM »

Trump to award Medal of Honor to deceased WWII veteran
By Samuel Chamberlain   | Fox News


U.S. Army Lt. Garlin Murl Conner is seen in this undated photo.  (AP Photo/Courtesy Conner Family Attorney)

President Trump will posthumously award the Medal of Honor to a World War II veteran for gallantry shown as an Army intelligence officer during the final months of the war, the White House said Thursday.

Trump will honor then-1st Lt. Garlin Conner posthumously for his actions on Jan. 24, 1945. According to the White House, Conner left a position of relative safety to get in a better position "to direct artillery fire onto the assaulting enemy infantry and armor."

Conner remained in an exposed position for three hours, despite the enemy coming within five yards of his position and friendly artillery shells exploding around him.

According to Military.com, Conner's heroism took place during a battle near Houssen, in northeastern France. The website reported that Conner had received the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions in that battle.

According to a citation for the Distinguished Service Cross, Conner "was individually credited with stopping more than 150 Germans, destroying all [six German] tanks and completely disintegrating the powerful enemy assault force and preventing heavy loss of life in his own outfit."

Conner, a Kentucky native, enlisted in the Army in March 1941 and saw combat in North Africa, Sicily and Western Europe during World War II. In all, Conner received four Silver Stars, one Bronze Star and three Purple Hearts in addition to the Distinguished Service Cross. He died in 1998, according to the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Conner's wife and family will join Trump at the White House for the medal ceremony. A date has not been set.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/03/29/trump-to-award-medal-honor-to-deceased-wwii-veteran.html
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« Reply #289 on: April 16, 2018, 09:55:18 AM »

Ranger’s heroic actions saved dozens, led to Silver Star medal
By: Todd South    

Staff Sgt. Michael Young was awarded the Silver Star medal for his actions in April 2017 on a raid with C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. (Spc. David Soflin/Army)

Army Staff Sgt. Michael Young was in the middle of his fifth combat deployment to Afghanistan last year when he and his fellow Rangers found themselves in an “terrifyingly chaotic” firefight from the moment they hit the ground that would last for hours.

They were working alongside their Afghan counterparts on a nighttime raid after a high- value target, Young said.

What Young, a squad leader in C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, did next would save the lives of 22 Rangers and result in his being awarded the Silver Star medal on Friday at Fort Benning, Georgia.

The 28-year-old Savannah, Georgia native was no stranger to the Ranger community growing up near the home of the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.


Staff Sgt. Michael Young, right, was awarded the Silver Star medal for his actions in April 2017 on a raid with C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. (Spc. David Soflin/Army) Staff Sgt. Michael Young, right, was awarded the Silver Star medal for his actions in April 2017 on a raid with C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. (Spc. David Soflin/Army)

From high school onward, his goal was to be a Ranger. That was achieved shortly after he enlisted in 2011 and soon joined the regiment.

The battalion had deployed in January 2017 to “various locations around the world to conduct counterterrorism operations.” The battalion’s primary mission was “dismantling terror threat networks and continuing to legitimize the governments of Afghanistan and other middle eastern countries.”

The Friday ceremony honored not only Young but also eight soldiers who received the Bronze Star for valor and 14 soldiers who were awarded the Joint Service Commendation Medal for Valor.

Young’s team was operating in Nangarhar province at the time of the raid.

On April 27, 2017, the strike force “received intense and precise enemy fire simultaneously from multiple covered positions in all directions immediately upon a helicopter insertion,” read his Silver Star medal citation.

Seeing the threat, Young “aggressively exposed himself to direct fires to eliminate the enemy and protect the force.”

He clambered up to the highest elevation point he could find, marked his position for the strike force and began reporting enemy positions for fire missions to knock out enemy targets.


Staff Sgt. Michael Young, second from left, was awarded the Silver Star medal for his actions in April 2017 on a raid with C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. Shown from left are 3/75 Command Sgt. Maj. Brett Johnson; Young; Lt. Gen. Austin S. Miller, commander of Joint Special Operations Command; and Lt. Col. Michael Kloepper, commander of 3rd Ranger Battalion. (Spc. David Soflin/Army) Staff Sgt. Michael Young, second from left, was awarded the Silver Star medal for his actions in April 2017 on a raid with C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. Shown from left are 3/75 Command Sgt. Maj. Brett Johnson; Young; Lt. Gen. Austin S. Miller, commander of Joint Special Operations Command; and Lt. Col. Michael Kloepper, commander of 3rd Ranger Battalion. (Spc. David Soflin/Army)

The ensuing four-hour firefight only rose in intensity, lasting into the night, Young said.

He and his element were cut off from the rest of the strike force but Young continued to expose himself to fire, calling in several “danger close” engagements to call in air bombardments. That allowed the medical evacuation helicopter to insert and retrieve two urgent surgical patients.

The staff sergeant said though not all the Rangers in the deployment nor the raid were presented with official awards, their efforts enabled him to do his job and vice versa.

He called their work “monumental” and said the deployment’s success was a testament to the regiment and how it trains.

“The training we conduct is always tough and gritty,” he said, and constant assessment allows them to maintain a high level of efficiency.

“It really showed itself in that situation and every situation,” Young said.

https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/04/13/rangers-heroic-actions-saved-dozens-led-to-silver-star-medal/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Socialflow
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