Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums
October 25, 2014, 08:26:50 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 25   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Stephen Hawking:'There is NO heaven; it's a fairy story'- HAHHA  (Read 18252 times)
The True Adonis
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 42734


"We Will Correct All This."


« on: May 17, 2011, 09:44:39 AM »

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2011/may/15/stephen-hawking-interview-there-is-no-heaven


Stephen Hawking: 'There is no heaven; it's a fairy story'
In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, the cosmologist shares his thoughts on death, M-theory, human purpose and our chance existence


 Sunday 15 May 2011 22.00 BST


Stephen Hawking dismisses belief in God in an exclusive interview with the Guardian.
A belief that heaven or an afterlife awaits us is a "fairy story" for people afraid of death, Stephen Hawking has said.

In a dismissal that underlines his firm rejection of religious comforts, Britain's most eminent scientist said there was nothing beyond the moment when the brain flickers for the final time.

Hawking, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21, shares his thoughts on death, human purpose and our chance existence in an exclusive interview with the Guardian today.

The incurable illness was expected to kill Hawking within a few years of its symptoms arising, an outlook that turned the young scientist to Wagner, but ultimately led him to enjoy life more, he has said, despite the cloud hanging over his future.

"I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I'm not afraid of death, but I'm in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first," he said.

"I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark," he added.

Hawking's latest comments go beyond those laid out in his 2010 book, The Grand Design, in which he asserted that there is no need for a creator to explain the existence of the universe. The book provoked a backlash from some religious leaders, including the chief rabbi, Lord Sacks, who accused Hawking of committing an "elementary fallacy" of logic.

The 69-year-old physicist fell seriously ill after a lecture tour in the US in 2009 and was taken to Addenbrookes hospital in an episode that sparked grave concerns for his health. He has since returned to his Cambridge department as director of research.

The physicist's remarks draw a stark line between the use of God as a metaphor and the belief in an omniscient creator whose hands guide the workings of the cosmos.

In his bestselling 1988 book, A Brief History of Time, Hawking drew on the device so beloved of Einstein, when he described what it would mean for scientists to develop a "theory of everything" – a set of equations that described every particle and force in the entire universe. "It would be the ultimate triumph of human reason – for then we should know the mind of God," he wrote.

The book sold a reported 9 million copies and propelled the physicist to instant stardom. His fame has led to guest roles in The Simpsons, Star Trek: The Next Generation and Red Dwarf. One of his greatest achievements in physics is a theory that describes how black holes emit radiation.

In the interview, Hawking rejected the notion of life beyond death and emphasised the need to fulfil our potential on Earth by making good use of our lives. In answer to a question on how we should live, he said, simply: "We should seek the greatest value of our action."

In answering another, he wrote of the beauty of science, such as the exquisite double helix of DNA in biology, or the fundamental equations of physics.

Hawking responded to questions posed by the Guardian and a reader in advance of a lecture tomorrow at the Google Zeitgeist meeting in London, in which he will address the question: "Why are we here?"

In the talk, he will argue that tiny quantum fluctuations in the very early universe became the seeds from which galaxies, stars, and ultimately human life emerged. "Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in," he said.

Hawking suggests that with modern space-based instruments, such as the European Space Agency's Planck mission, it may be possible to spot ancient fingerprints in the light left over from the earliest moments of the universe and work out how our own place in space came to be.

His talk will focus on M-theory, a broad mathematical framework that encompasses string theory, which is regarded by many physicists as the best hope yet of developing a theory of everything.

M-theory demands a universe with 11 dimensions, including a dimension of time and the three familiar spatial dimensions. The rest are curled up too small for us to see.

Evidence in support of M-theory might also come from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva.

One possibility predicted by M-theory is supersymmetry, an idea that says fundamental particles have heavy – and as yet undiscovered – twins, with curious names such as selectrons and squarks.

Confirmation of supersymmetry would be a shot in the arm for M-theory and help physicists explain how each force at work in the universe arose from one super-force at the dawn of time.

Another potential discovery at the LHC, that of the elusive Higgs boson, which is thought to give mass to elementary particles, might be less welcome to Hawking, who has a long-standing bet that the long-sought entity will never be found at the laboratory.

Hawking will join other speakers at the London event, including the chancellor, George Osborne, and the Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz.

Science, truth and beauty: Hawking's answers

What is the value in knowing "Why are we here?"

The universe is governed by science. But science tells us that we can't solve the equations, directly in the abstract. We need to use the effective theory of Darwinian natural selection of those societies most likely to survive. We assign them higher value.

You've said there is no reason to invoke God to light the blue touchpaper. Is our existence all down to luck?

Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in.

So here we are. What should we do?

We should seek the greatest value of our action.

You had a health scare and spent time in hospital in 2009. What, if anything, do you fear about death?

I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I'm not afraid of death, but I'm in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first. I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.

What are the things you find most beautiful in science?

Science is beautiful when it makes simple explanations of phenomena or connections between different observations. Examples include the double helix in biology, and the fundamental equations of physics."
Report to moderator   Logged

E
uberman
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 10215



« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2011, 09:47:19 AM »

looks like someone is so depressed he wants everyone else to be as depressed as him before... dying.

A true humanist  Undecided


Quote
So here we are. What should we do?

We should seek the greatest value of our action.


oookaay....
Report to moderator   Logged
NarcissisticDeity
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 44073


I dont care what Ronnie says bc hes not a credible


« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2011, 09:48:51 AM »

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2011/may/15/stephen-hawking-interview-there-is-no-heaven


Stephen Hawking: 'There is no heaven; it's a fairy story'
In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, the cosmologist shares his thoughts on death, M-theory, human purpose and our chance existence


 Sunday 15 May 2011 22.00 BST


Stephen Hawking dismisses belief in God in an exclusive interview with the Guardian.
A belief that heaven or an afterlife awaits us is a "fairy story" for people afraid of death, Stephen Hawking has said.

In a dismissal that underlines his firm rejection of religious comforts, Britain's most eminent scientist said there was nothing beyond the moment when the brain flickers for the final time.

Hawking, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21, shares his thoughts on death, human purpose and our chance existence in an exclusive interview with the Guardian today.

The incurable illness was expected to kill Hawking within a few years of its symptoms arising, an outlook that turned the young scientist to Wagner, but ultimately led him to enjoy life more, he has said, despite the cloud hanging over his future.

"I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I'm not afraid of death, but I'm in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first," he said.

"I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark," he added.

Hawking's latest comments go beyond those laid out in his 2010 book, The Grand Design, in which he asserted that there is no need for a creator to explain the existence of the universe. The book provoked a backlash from some religious leaders, including the chief rabbi, Lord Sacks, who accused Hawking of committing an "elementary fallacy" of logic.

The 69-year-old physicist fell seriously ill after a lecture tour in the US in 2009 and was taken to Addenbrookes hospital in an episode that sparked grave concerns for his health. He has since returned to his Cambridge department as director of research.

The physicist's remarks draw a stark line between the use of God as a metaphor and the belief in an omniscient creator whose hands guide the workings of the cosmos.

In his bestselling 1988 book, A Brief History of Time, Hawking drew on the device so beloved of Einstein, when he described what it would mean for scientists to develop a "theory of everything" – a set of equations that described every particle and force in the entire universe. "It would be the ultimate triumph of human reason – for then we should know the mind of God," he wrote.

The book sold a reported 9 million copies and propelled the physicist to instant stardom. His fame has led to guest roles in The Simpsons, Star Trek: The Next Generation and Red Dwarf. One of his greatest achievements in physics is a theory that describes how black holes emit radiation.

In the interview, Hawking rejected the notion of life beyond death and emphasised the need to fulfil our potential on Earth by making good use of our lives. In answer to a question on how we should live, he said, simply: "We should seek the greatest value of our action."

In answering another, he wrote of the beauty of science, such as the exquisite double helix of DNA in biology, or the fundamental equations of physics.

Hawking responded to questions posed by the Guardian and a reader in advance of a lecture tomorrow at the Google Zeitgeist meeting in London, in which he will address the question: "Why are we here?"

In the talk, he will argue that tiny quantum fluctuations in the very early universe became the seeds from which galaxies, stars, and ultimately human life emerged. "Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in," he said.

Hawking suggests that with modern space-based instruments, such as the European Space Agency's Planck mission, it may be possible to spot ancient fingerprints in the light left over from the earliest moments of the universe and work out how our own place in space came to be.

His talk will focus on M-theory, a broad mathematical framework that encompasses string theory, which is regarded by many physicists as the best hope yet of developing a theory of everything.

M-theory demands a universe with 11 dimensions, including a dimension of time and the three familiar spatial dimensions. The rest are curled up too small for us to see.

Evidence in support of M-theory might also come from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva.

One possibility predicted by M-theory is supersymmetry, an idea that says fundamental particles have heavy – and as yet undiscovered – twins, with curious names such as selectrons and squarks.

Confirmation of supersymmetry would be a shot in the arm for M-theory and help physicists explain how each force at work in the universe arose from one super-force at the dawn of time.

Another potential discovery at the LHC, that of the elusive Higgs boson, which is thought to give mass to elementary particles, might be less welcome to Hawking, who has a long-standing bet that the long-sought entity will never be found at the laboratory.

Hawking will join other speakers at the London event, including the chancellor, George Osborne, and the Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz.

Science, truth and beauty: Hawking's answers

What is the value in knowing "Why are we here?"

The universe is governed by science. But science tells us that we can't solve the equations, directly in the abstract. We need to use the effective theory of Darwinian natural selection of those societies most likely to survive. We assign them higher value.

You've said there is no reason to invoke God to light the blue touchpaper. Is our existence all down to luck?

Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in.

So here we are. What should we do?

We should seek the greatest value of our action.

You had a health scare and spent time in hospital in 2009. What, if anything, do you fear about death?

I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I'm not afraid of death, but I'm in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first. I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.

What are the things you find most beautiful in science?

Science is beautiful when it makes simple explanations of phenomena or connections between different observations. Examples include the double helix in biology, and the fundamental equations of physics."


I figured this out when I was a child  Grin
Report to moderator   Logged
The True Adonis
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 42734


"We Will Correct All This."


« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2011, 09:49:50 AM »

looks like someone is so depressed he wants everyone else to be as depressed as him before... dying.

A true humanist  Undecided
Looks like you are a fairy tale believing shit brain.
Report to moderator   Logged

E
Army of One
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 20786



« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2011, 09:50:58 AM »

Looks like you are a fairy tale believing shit brain.

You seem very angry lately ,Adonis.What is the reason for this?
Report to moderator   Logged
Bam-bam
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 4335


Britney Spears fan 4 life


« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2011, 09:51:25 AM »

so what has this retard genius ever done? any nobel prizes? fortune 500 companies? sports trophies??  Huh
Report to moderator   Logged
The True Adonis
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 42734


"We Will Correct All This."


« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2011, 09:53:28 AM »

You seem very angry lately ,Adonis.What is the reason for this?
If I come across as angry, which I am certainly not, I do apologize.  I must confide that I am incredibly ecstatic about my current circumstance as I believe I have followed Hawking`s wise advice "Seek the greatest value from your action".

Report to moderator   Logged

E
Fallsview
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3005

Mr. Mike Thompson RV 2014


« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2011, 09:53:35 AM »

ALSO THIS JUST IN:  STEROIDS KILL!!!!!!


* steroid user-gym rat.jpg (17.72 KB, 240x312 - viewed 1515 times.)
Report to moderator   Logged
uberman
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 10215



« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2011, 09:54:46 AM »

so what has this retard genius ever done? any nobel prizes? fortune 500 companies? sports trophies??  Huh
telling other human beings that what they feel , think, makes no sense and that god, heaven doesnt exist. Dude obviously loves life and others ...

And that "So here we are. What should we do?

We should seek the greatest value of our action."


 Roll Eyes


Sometimes you wonder why he s born crippled.... maybe there s some karma, cause and consequence he didnt think of lol. Maybe his parents didnt want him, maybe his mother smoked or drank when she was pregnant of him, hence his disabilities... One thing is sure his message to mankind only motivates people like true anus -who finds kids "disgusting" - to spray his word with many "HAHA" added to his lines. And we all know what kind of character true anus is. The kind of individual nobody wants to deal with.

Mankind should only be made of people like true anus with no education, no jobs, no caring family, living in their gf's appartment and who portray themselves as pseudo intelectuals on the internet because of some real life complexions, and who adopt... dogs!

Also back on topic,  re-inventing schopenhauer isnt a feat either. Cause that's all this depressing little individual has done.
Report to moderator   Logged
Fallsview
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3005

Mr. Mike Thompson RV 2014


« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2011, 09:55:24 AM »

ALSO THIS JUST IN:  SUB SHACKS GRAND OPENING!!!!!!


* SUB SHACK...YEAH!!!!!.jpg (63.11 KB, 603x332 - viewed 1502 times.)
Report to moderator   Logged
uberman
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 10215



« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2011, 09:57:49 AM »

If I come across as angry, which I am certainly not, I do apologize.  I must confide that I am incredibly ecstatic about my current circumstance as I believe I have followed Hawking`s wise advice "Seek the greatest value from your action".



Nobody likes you, that's why you and hawking think the same about life. See, it's not that hard to understand. Judging by pics i ve seen of you and your behavior on here, i easily understand why you end rejected by everyone. You dont want kids who are "disgusting", you copy and paste an article written by hawking a crippled ugly looking man who message to manking is "life makes no sense and heaven doesnt exist", it's quite clear you guys both werent loved much by your parents originally, hence your harted toward mankind as a whole.

Keep up the "good" job, you re oviously enjoying it, looks like... it gives a meaning, ironically, to your own life!

Report to moderator   Logged
funk51
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 16536


Getbig!


« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2011, 09:58:43 AM »

god has a sense of humour he created stephen hawkings.


* buddy_christ.jpg (31.28 KB, 370x284 - viewed 1484 times.)
Report to moderator   Logged
Halcyon
Time Out
Getbig II
*
Posts: 65


an undercover pro


« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2011, 09:58:54 AM »

If I come across as angry, which I am certainly not, I do apologize.  I must confide that I am incredibly ecstatic about my current circumstance as I believe I have followed Hawking`s wise advice "Seek the greatest value from your action".



very well said my friend.
Report to moderator   Logged
Maldoror
Time Out
Getbig III
*
Posts: 327

Getbig!


« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2011, 10:03:57 AM »

Impossible to know one way or the other. Nothing can be proven about life after death, no hypothesis can be put forth... While modern religions are as ridiculous as fairytales, science, too, is of no use to us.

Unamuno, Spain's greatest philosopher, wrote an excellent book about this. In a nutshell: His heart wanted to believe in life after death, but his head wouldn't let him. It's the same for most of us, I guess. I suppose we'll figure it out once we're dead.
Report to moderator   Logged
Coach is Back!
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 24723


He won by a "landslide" lol


WWW
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2011, 10:06:56 AM »

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2011/may/15/stephen-hawking-interview-there-is-no-heaven


Stephen Hawking: 'There is no heaven; it's a fairy story'
In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, the cosmologist shares his thoughts on death, M-theory, human purpose and our chance existence


 Sunday 15 May 2011 22.00 BST


Stephen Hawking dismisses belief in God in an exclusive interview with the Guardian.
A belief that heaven or an afterlife awaits us is a "fairy story" for people afraid of death, Stephen Hawking has said.

In a dismissal that underlines his firm rejection of religious comforts, Britain's most eminent scientist said there was nothing beyond the moment when the brain flickers for the final time.

Hawking, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21, shares his thoughts on death, human purpose and our chance existence in an exclusive interview with the Guardian today.

The incurable illness was expected to kill Hawking within a few years of its symptoms arising, an outlook that turned the young scientist to Wagner, but ultimately led him to enjoy life more, he has said, despite the cloud hanging over his future.

"I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I'm not afraid of death, but I'm in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first," he said.

"I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark," he added.

Hawking's latest comments go beyond those laid out in his 2010 book, The Grand Design, in which he asserted that there is no need for a creator to explain the existence of the universe. The book provoked a backlash from some religious leaders, including the chief rabbi, Lord Sacks, who accused Hawking of committing an "elementary fallacy" of logic.

The 69-year-old physicist fell seriously ill after a lecture tour in the US in 2009 and was taken to Addenbrookes hospital in an episode that sparked grave concerns for his health. He has since returned to his Cambridge department as director of research.

The physicist's remarks draw a stark line between the use of God as a metaphor and the belief in an omniscient creator whose hands guide the workings of the cosmos.

In his bestselling 1988 book, A Brief History of Time, Hawking drew on the device so beloved of Einstein, when he described what it would mean for scientists to develop a "theory of everything" – a set of equations that described every particle and force in the entire universe. "It would be the ultimate triumph of human reason – for then we should know the mind of God," he wrote.

The book sold a reported 9 million copies and propelled the physicist to instant stardom. His fame has led to guest roles in The Simpsons, Star Trek: The Next Generation and Red Dwarf. One of his greatest achievements in physics is a theory that describes how black holes emit radiation.

In the interview, Hawking rejected the notion of life beyond death and emphasised the need to fulfil our potential on Earth by making good use of our lives. In answer to a question on how we should live, he said, simply: "We should seek the greatest value of our action."

In answering another, he wrote of the beauty of science, such as the exquisite double helix of DNA in biology, or the fundamental equations of physics.

Hawking responded to questions posed by the Guardian and a reader in advance of a lecture tomorrow at the Google Zeitgeist meeting in London, in which he will address the question: "Why are we here?"

In the talk, he will argue that tiny quantum fluctuations in the very early universe became the seeds from which galaxies, stars, and ultimately human life emerged. "Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in," he said.

Hawking suggests that with modern space-based instruments, such as the European Space Agency's Planck mission, it may be possible to spot ancient fingerprints in the light left over from the earliest moments of the universe and work out how our own place in space came to be.

His talk will focus on M-theory, a broad mathematical framework that encompasses string theory, which is regarded by many physicists as the best hope yet of developing a theory of everything.

M-theory demands a universe with 11 dimensions, including a dimension of time and the three familiar spatial dimensions. The rest are curled up too small for us to see.

Evidence in support of M-theory might also come from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva.

One possibility predicted by M-theory is supersymmetry, an idea that says fundamental particles have heavy – and as yet undiscovered – twins, with curious names such as selectrons and squarks.

Confirmation of supersymmetry would be a shot in the arm for M-theory and help physicists explain how each force at work in the universe arose from one super-force at the dawn of time.

Another potential discovery at the LHC, that of the elusive Higgs boson, which is thought to give mass to elementary particles, might be less welcome to Hawking, who has a long-standing bet that the long-sought entity will never be found at the laboratory.

Hawking will join other speakers at the London event, including the chancellor, George Osborne, and the Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz.

Science, truth and beauty: Hawking's answers

What is the value in knowing "Why are we here?"

The universe is governed by science. But science tells us that we can't solve the equations, directly in the abstract. We need to use the effective theory of Darwinian natural selection of those societies most likely to survive. We assign them higher value.

You've said there is no reason to invoke God to light the blue touchpaper. Is our existence all down to luck?

Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in.

So here we are. What should we do?

We should seek the greatest value of our action.

You had a health scare and spent time in hospital in 2009. What, if anything, do you fear about death?

I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I'm not afraid of death, but I'm in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first. I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.

What are the things you find most beautiful in science?

Science is beautiful when it makes simple explanations of phenomena or connections between different observations. Examples include the double helix in biology, and the fundamental equations of physics."


He's entitled to his opinion. He's writing a book you know, needs the controversy to help promote it. Plus he's just pissed off because every time he has to go to the bathroom he shits himself. God's sense of humor at work Smiley
Report to moderator   Logged
uberman
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 10215



« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2011, 10:08:04 AM »

if we understand the meaning of life, life wont make  sense anymore. Looking for the understanding of life actually constitutes life's meaning. If we stop looking for something, we have nothing else to do.
If the answer is that life has no meaning, well, you know where this kind of thoughts lead to.

Some say our ability to "think" and "feel" are a result of evolution. That it serves no other purpose but to keep us alive.
Considering evolution makes mistakes and that some strategies of survival do not work, maybe thinking and feeling is a strategy of evolution that wont work.
Life wants to perpetuate itself. If you want to kill yourself and convince other people to kill themselves, then you re anti-life, period.
Report to moderator   Logged
YngiweRhoads
Getbig IV
****
Gender: Male
Posts: 3313


Shreddin'


WWW
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2011, 10:09:34 AM »

Impossible to know one way or the other. Nothing can be proven about life after death, no hypothesis can be put forth... While modern religions are as ridiculous as fairytales, science, too, is of no use to us.

Unamuno, Spain's greatest philosopher, wrote an excellent book about this. In a nutshell: His heart wanted to believe in life after death, but his head wouldn't let him. It's the same for most of us, I guess. I suppose we'll figure it out once we're dead.

Philosophy is dead.

Philosophy doesn't account for the most recent advances in physics over the last 25 years. They still contemplate early 20th century quantum physics.

It's dead.
Report to moderator   Logged

6
bradistani
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 57049



WWW
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2011, 10:10:22 AM »

he's probably got a book out or something.
Report to moderator   Logged
Fallsview
Getbig IV
****
Posts: 3005

Mr. Mike Thompson RV 2014


« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2011, 10:11:02 AM »

Mr. Adonis, how would your Civil War ancestors feel about your modern day belief since they based so much faith into "their" God?

"Every click was a prayer; every stitch a tear.”

"My God, has the army dissolved?"

General John B. Gordon, who actively participated in the revival, tells us that in every camp
religious altars were erected around which ragged soldiers knelt and worshiped: “The religious
revivals which ensued formed a most remarkable and important chapter in war history. Rocks
and woods rang with appeals to holiness. Thousands became soldiers of the Cross.”

MAYBE THEIR BELIEF IN GOD IS WHY THE SOUTH LOST.....?


STAY POSITIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Report to moderator   Logged
uberman
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 10215



« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2011, 10:12:19 AM »

Philosophy is dead.

Philosophy doesn't account for the most recent advances in physics over the last 25 years. They still contemplate early 20th century quantum physics.

It's dead.
philosophy isnt "dead". To "think" is ...being a philosopher.

Nowadays we just mix everything philosophy, psychology, psychoanalysis, neurology, biology, ethology, anthropology etc have found and are building a new way to conceptualize our existence. Everything is the sum of what preceded it , the selection of what was considered -by who, what?- as adapted for life and the destruction of what isnt. With the internet more and more people, even of "lower education/intelligence" have access to all these knowledges.

And we all use all these informations to fuck each other in the ass and dominate most of the time, to increase our own odds of survival even if at the expense of someone else. Not to help. Religion actually taught individuals to survive while helping each others, that's the only part of it that was positive. And... it has allowed us to build our modern civilizations with police, armies, law , order , cars, electricity and so on. Some people abused it as usual and now it has been abandonned, and mankind is now building something new and more global.

Again everything is the sum of everything that precedes it.
Report to moderator   Logged
Coach is Back!
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 24723


He won by a "landslide" lol


WWW
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2011, 10:12:23 AM »

he's probably got a book out or something.

Not yet. It's in the works.
Report to moderator   Logged
loco
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 9073

Getbig!


« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2011, 10:13:14 AM »

if we understand the meaning of life, life wont make  sense anymore. Looking for the understanding of life actually constitutes life's meaning. If we stop looking for something, we have nothing else to do.
If the answer is that life has no meaning, well, you know where this kind of thoughts lead to.

Some say our ability to "think" and "feel" are a result of evolution. That it serves no other purpose but to keep us alive.
Considering evolution makes mistakes and that some strategies of survival do not work, maybe thinking and feeling is a strategy of evolution that wont work.
Life wants to perpetuate itself. If you want to kill yourself and convince other people to kill themselves, then you re anti-life, period.

To be born, reproduce and then die.    Lips sealed
Report to moderator   Logged
James28
Getbig IV
****
Gender: Male
Posts: 3447


toilet roll of peace


« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2011, 10:13:27 AM »

You mean there is NOT an invisible ghost in the sky that created everything that is substance by uttering words? Whatever gave people that idea?

I love when we talk about evolution and progress when we're still naked, flopping helplessly in the primordial ooze.
Report to moderator   Logged

*
Coach is Back!
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 24723


He won by a "landslide" lol


WWW
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2011, 10:15:09 AM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBlP1hfB3fQ" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBlP1hfB3fQ</a>
Report to moderator   Logged
pluck
Getbig IV
****
Gender: Male
Posts: 1896


Getbig!


WWW
« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2011, 10:16:41 AM »

While True Anus is a gimmicky ass clown he's right with this post.

Here come all the religious nut huggers (I used to be one until I started reading books) with their female-esque emotional arguments about the existence of their long bearded man in the sky. Think about this for a second, the ONLY reason you believe in god or whatever is because you were raised as a little kid going to sunday school, church, communion, bible study...etc or any combination of those things. You just accept it because it was drilled in your head for years, decades, ...

None of your religious zealots have read any of his work so obviously it's heresy that does not make sense.

"hehehe hawkings is god's joke he hehehe" come on. Is that a real argument to support your fairy tale in the sky?
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 25   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Theme created by Egad Community. Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!