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Author Topic: High reps?  (Read 3930 times)
oldtimer1
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« on: March 31, 2012, 01:56:13 PM »

I have always been a 6 to 8 reps kind of trainer. I'm about to up the reps per set drastically like 12 to 15.  I have been training for over 35 years and it's about time to give up the grinding heavy stuff. I know it's hurts the ego to be in a gym doing high reps with a short rest inbetween sets cause it really limits the amount of weight you can lift.

 One guy I respect said you have to swallow your pride.  It's a new challenge. Now it's how far I can push my endurance with the weights.  It's great to load up the bar or go to the right side of the dumbbell rack where the big weights are. For me it's time to focus on another goal.  
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« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2012, 02:04:31 PM »

I've been there for about 2 years now dude... you'll be surprised to find that you feel stronger and some of your muscles may actually look (and be) bigger... my chest, arms and lats look and are bigger today than they were 2 years ago even though i train them with significantly less weight

i liked using heavy poundages for years and believe that it's a great way to build a good foundation... but in your mid-30s or early 40s i think it makes sense to train for longevity...
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oldtimer1
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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2012, 02:45:44 PM »

I think I had my best years in bodybuilding in my mid 40's. I ran decent times in 5K's and lifted hard for heavy 6 to 8 reps. When I hear guys say it's over in your 40's I really never felt it.   I really pushed what was for me heavy weights back then. I think most guys who don't use steroids will tell you as you approach your mid 50's, you really begin to see aging in your athletics. 
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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2012, 03:21:18 PM »

Gotcha. I'm still a ways away (33). But I am currently training for 5k races... Just needed a longer term focus.
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jakesonyou
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« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2012, 03:35:13 PM »

why exactly do you need to stop lifting heavy weights?  how light are you lifting now?

my father has trained his entire life and still follows a heavy compound lift routine.  He is in excellent health and has no joint or muscle problems.

I think the only reason one should change if you are bored with your current routine or you want to try something new.

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oldtimer1
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« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2012, 03:59:13 PM »

I train for health and fitness first. Lastly for looks. I know a lot of guys are still doing the powerlift thing in their fifties but they tend to look like a sloppy permabulker with their shirts off. Doing 3 or 6 lifts for sets of low reps isn't my thing. I train like a bodybuilder usually using 3 to 4 exercises per bodypart.

Many guys if they have been lifting heavy for 30 to 40 years have many injuries that could end their lifting if they are not careful.  Paul Anderson, John Grimek, Lou Ferrigno, Clarence Bass and a few others have had hip replacements.  A whole boat load have shoulder problems. I completely ripped off my biceps from it's insertion. It rolled up my shoulder like a venetian  blind.  After it's repair with metal anchors in my arm I wouldn't want to be doing singles in deadlifts anymore.

Maybe it is just for a change and I will go back to power body building. I would like to train for strength, power, speed, endurance, anaerobic and aerobic goals which means I will be the master of nothing.
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wes
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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2012, 04:39:24 PM »

I do a pyramid thing on most exercises,dropping reps as I increase poundages.

EXAMPLE:

Squats:
1 x 20,12,10,8,5,then back down in weight for a hard 10-15 depending on how things go,and how I feel.

There`s a school of thought that both high and low reps should be used to hit both fast and slow twitch fibers,and this accomplishes that as well as making sure you are fully warmed up before graduating to heavier poundages in the later sets.

I don`t do this on everything,but I usually do, as my routine is never quite the same at any given training session.

I like higher reps though as I`m older than table salt and contrary to others opinions,I think getting a good pump is very beneficial.

Just my useless two centavos!  Smiley
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jakesonyou
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« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2012, 04:57:14 PM »

I train for health and fitness first. Lastly for looks. I know a lot of guys are still doing the powerlift thing in their fifties but they tend to look like a sloppy permabulker with their shirts off. Doing 3 or 6 lifts for sets of low reps isn't my thing. I train like a bodybuilder usually using 3 to 4 exercises per bodypart.

Many guys if they have been lifting heavy for 30 to 40 years have many injuries that could end their lifting if they are not careful.  Paul Anderson, John Grimek, Lou Ferrigno, Clarence Bass and a few others have had hip replacements.  A whole boat load have shoulder problems. I completely ripped off my biceps from it's insertion. It rolled up my shoulder like a venetian  blind.  After it's repair with metal anchors in my arm I wouldn't want to be doing singles in deadlifts anymore.

Maybe it is just for a change and I will go back to power body building. I would like to train for strength, power, speed, endurance, anaerobic and aerobic goals which means I will be the master of nothing.
sorry to hear about your injury.

all I am saying is you don't have to drop the barbell and pick up the pink dumbbells since you are older.

I am a believer of 5-7 reps for most exercises other than calves and forearms.  Some exercises it's 5-7 until failure.  This has always worked for me.

I do not believe in useless 1 reps to stroke the ego.  Anything under 5 is a waste of time in my opinion.

I think you could still do 5-7 reps with a good amount of weight.  If you are on edge, maybe in moderation  Smiley
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« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2012, 05:18:27 PM »

don't get me wrong... i don't go much lighter... just don't do any sets under 10 reps
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oldtimer1
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« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2012, 06:28:44 PM »

Heavy is relative. Doing sets of 12 reps in the bench with a moderate weight will feel really heavy after 4 or 5 sets. Doing two sets of 6 reps will allow heavier training but is it just apples to oranges?  Is intensity the magic bullet to growth? Or is intensity over multiple sets the magic bullet?

Yates does a warm up or two and hits his single work set.  Danny Padilla did 5 sets o 12 for everything. Both are working hard but it's like comparing a marathon runner to a sprinter. A sprinter would never say to a marathoner your training is a piece of cake because it's not intense like my training.

I don't want to get into a HIT vs volume debate.

Wes I always consider your imput. We both have been training forever. 
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wes
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« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2012, 06:44:35 PM »

Thanks Rich,and I always enjoy your training threads,even though we both train quite differently.

I think we`ll always be training until, as they say,they`ll have to pry a barbell from our cold dead hands!  Wink
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Yev33
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« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2012, 11:33:44 PM »

I guess im relatively young (28), but lifting heavy week in and week out takes a toll on me. I program my training where every third week I will work in the 4-6 rep range, and only for the main movement of the workout.
 Doesn't fry out my CNS and allows me to keep gaining. But there is definetely a benefit of going heavy (88-100% of 1rm) but it has to programmed with reason.
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oldtimer1
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« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2012, 04:42:18 AM »

Yev, I think anyone in their 20's, 30's and even into your 40's should always have heavy training cycles. It drives me nuts when I see a guy in his twenties talking through his set obviously not pushing himself.

You're right though. You shouldn't always train heavy or quick burn out can happen.
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« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2012, 05:20:38 AM »

Yev, I think anyone in their 20's, 30's and even into your 40's should always have heavy training cycles. It drives me nuts when I see a guy in his twenties talking through his set obviously not pushing himself.

You're right though. You shouldn't always train heavy or quick burn out can happen.


agreed... my biggest fucking pet peeve is some jerk off hogging the bench for a half hour to complete 4 sets and 6 phone calls...
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Montague
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« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2012, 05:29:45 AM »


agreed... my biggest fucking pet peeve is some jerk off hogging the bench for a half hour to complete 4 sets and 6 phone calls...


I can remember seeing an older guy years ago at my one gym; it was a weekday morning.
Granted there weren't many people in the gym and I wasn't training legs that day, but I was still perturbed to watch this man sit on the leg press machine and read the newspaper between sets.

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« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2012, 11:45:56 AM »

Periodiaztion is key to training longevity and intensity is always a must whether training heavy or lighter.

Sitting around for ages between sets is not good unless you are maxing out and then it shouldn`t be sitting around reading !  Grin
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« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2012, 01:24:57 PM »

I train for health and fitness first. Lastly for looks. I know a lot of guys are still doing the powerlift thing in their fifties but they tend to look like a sloppy permabulker with their shirts off. Doing 3 or 6 lifts for sets of low reps isn't my thing.


Not always true! LOL



Quote
. I completely ripped off my biceps from it's insertion. It rolled up my shoulder like a venetian  blind.  After it's repair with metal anchors in my arm I wouldn't want to be doing singles in deadlifts anymore.

I had the same injury 100% tear had surgery  in a cast for 8 weeks ect ect. I have no problem deadlifting. Lost about a 100 lbs off the lift!, LOL. But  back to almost 400 now.
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oldtimer1
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« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2012, 01:59:20 PM »


Not always true! LOL



I had the same injury 100% tear had surgery  in a cast for 8 weeks ect ect. I have no problem deadlifting. Lost about a 100 lbs off the lift!, LOL. But  back to almost 400 now.

I agree it's not always true.  I guess that sounded insulting to those who powerlift; especially at the lighter weight catagories. I powerlifted in the late 70's as a teenager in the 148lbs class. I know there are ripped powerlifters though it's rare.

I got up to 405lbs after the injury with deadlifts but I feel it's foolish to tempt faith for me by going heavier. I have heard on this board of a powerlifter on this board saying he had his bicep repaired and had it rip again deadlifting. I still power clean and power snatch but of course the weights are no wear near deadlifting weight.  It's a lot safer with a double over hand pronate grip instead of reversing.
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Yev33
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« Reply #18 on: April 01, 2012, 03:31:19 PM »

I would just like to say that I have nothing but respect for the guys in their 50's and older still training hard. Whether it's high reps, low reps, mix, and everything in between.
I have met several guys in their late fifties that still train on a consistent basis and are in great shape. It's awesome to see that.
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John O
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« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2012, 03:51:25 PM »

I'll be 54 this July. I do have to be a lot smarter now thats for sure! Everything is once a week, deadlift once every 2 weeks  Wink
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« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2012, 04:09:46 PM »

high reps are a part of my Training year round. since i past my mid 40s (im close to 49 now) i recognized that training heavy all the time lead in the end to serious injury (i had 2 serious injuries in the past, 11 + 4 years ago, Training + 32 years).
I alternate my routines, still doing a relative heavy workout, but only using the exercises i had a good feeling and controll with high weights. next time i train the same muscle again i use reps in the 10-15 range, and the next time i train the same muscles i go "all out" with high reps. In my heavy workouts (for example) i still can go up for 4-6 reps with 180-190 lbs. dumbells in the incline dumbell press. On "my light" training day i use 115 lbs. Dumbells for 30-35 reps. So my tendoms, ligaments have a break from heavy loads for 10 Days. Training the whole body every 4-6 days (3 Trainings in 4, 5 or 6 days, 4 Days for the light weights cycle, 5 days for the medium heavy cycle, 6 days for the heavy cycle).
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jon cole
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« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2012, 03:41:57 AM »

monday = heavy bench 5-8 reps range
tuesday = heavy squat 5-8 reps range

friday = warmup on squat and bench and then one set of +20 reps.


i like it.
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asstropin
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« Reply #22 on: April 28, 2012, 02:22:48 AM »

all depends on your body type, soon as i hit 25/26 i suffered terrible injuries one after the other and it more or less ruined me competing again

its all well and good preaching lower reps and heavy compounds, until you get bitten by injuries then you see the other side of the picture

moderate is the way to go if you want to be in the game for years to come
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« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2012, 05:46:06 AM »

all depends on your body type, soon as i hit 25/26 i suffered terrible injuries one after the other and it more or less ruined me competing again

its all well and good preaching lower reps and heavy compounds, until you get bitten by injuries then you see the other side of the picture

moderate is the way to go if you want to be in the game for years to come
Great advice. I get a great pump doing more sets in the 8-10 rep range. I have on some exercises just not counted reps but pushed out till i failed. I used to bench in the 5-6 rep range but now i do more reps. I would not however do more than 12 reps. Legs are another matter Wink
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« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2012, 12:26:41 PM »

i totaly agree on legs.... higher rep leg work is totaly sick and as close to torture as you can get

we used to finish our leg workouts with high rep horizontal hacks, used to get in over 30 odd reps, see stars and shake uncontrollably, fun times...
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