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Author Topic: heater is hot despite it's closed (in the off position)  (Read 2113 times)
anabolichalo
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« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2012, 08:08:53 AM »

are you fukking kidding?
this is a bodybuilding forum you boring kunt, just fukk right off with all your shit threads, jesus christ...
bodybuilding is nothing but peds and shmoes
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anabolichalo
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« Reply #26 on: December 27, 2012, 11:00:27 AM »

despite that i took off the plastic cap and secured the little pin in the "in" position the heater is still hot


fuck

i'm gonna need a plumber $$$$$$$$$$$$
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bass generator
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« Reply #27 on: December 27, 2012, 11:04:41 AM »

The valves are a couple of quid from a builders merchant and a 5 minute job with a few spanners and some ptfe tape. Or you could pay a plummer his call out fee plus an hours labour plus parts....
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Tapeworm
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« Reply #28 on: December 27, 2012, 04:57:05 PM »

ok i took the plastic off and there is this little pin that can be pressed in but pushed back out

so i taped it up in the "in" position

let's see if it cools down now

Huh.  A poppy pin?   Huh  Well, I thought it would be rotational.  Most metering and isolation valves are.  You're on your own, kid. 
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anabolichalo
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« Reply #29 on: December 27, 2012, 04:59:44 PM »

Huh.  A poppy pin?   Huh  Well, I thought it would be rotational.  Most metering and isolation valves are.  You're on your own, kid. 
MY GOD!

i emailed a frend whose dad is a heaterfixing specialist

he says the poppy pin thingy has to be OUT not IN for the heater to be off

so i removed the tape contraption and pulled it out

and now the heater is cold


the more you know
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Tapeworm
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« Reply #30 on: December 27, 2012, 05:04:16 PM »

Yes, just as I suspected.
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anabolichalo
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« Reply #31 on: December 27, 2012, 05:07:22 PM »

i'm so relieved

they always say plumbers are thieves that charge obscene amounts for not doing shit
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Tapeworm
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« Reply #32 on: December 27, 2012, 05:20:38 PM »

relieved


A little valve humor there.
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Primemuscle
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« Reply #33 on: December 27, 2012, 05:22:19 PM »

Roll Eyes

Electric heat is the most inefficient by far.  Natural Gas is the best in my opinion.

I just finished reading the winter 2013 edition of Fine Homebuilding - Energy Smart Homes. There is a article that covers the latest in heating. In super energy efficient homes, electric heat is the most temperature adjustable. Gas forced air runs hot and cold as opposed to providing a constant temperature. Radiant heat is efficient and exceptionally clean. It is a good choice for folks prone to allergies. The addition of an air to air heat exchanger keeps the air in you place fresh.

Our house has gas forced air. Having been built in the late 70's with lots of vaulted ceilings and a fair amount of glass, it is not the most energy efficient house. I installed a 98% efficient furnace that cycles both the fan and the flame according to how much heat is needed about 5 years ago. Never-the-less, our gas bill averages about $150 a month in the winter and our electric bill almost doubles because the fan is running a lot of the time. We also have gas hot water, but we cook with electric.

In an effort to conserve energy, I am gradually switching over to LED lighting wherever possible. We replaced all the windows in the house several years back with energy efficient ones. That was a killer expense since we have 30 windows in our house.
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Roger Bacon
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« Reply #34 on: December 27, 2012, 05:23:54 PM »

Roll Eyes

Electric heat is the most inefficient by far.  Natural Gas is the best in my opinion.

I like Natural Gas/Forced Air more, and it's cheaper where I live but I believe electric heat is 100% efficient.
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The True Adonis
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« Reply #35 on: December 27, 2012, 05:24:33 PM »

I just finished reading the winter 2013 edition of Fine Homebuilding - Energy Smart Homes. There is a article that covers the latest in heating. In super energy efficient homes, electric heat is the most temperature adjustable. Gas forced air runs hot and cold as opposed to providing a constant temperature. Radiant heat is efficient and exceptionally clean. It is a good choice for folks prone to allergies. The addition of an air to air heat exchanger keeps the air in you place fresh.

Our house has gas forced air. Having been built in the late 70's with lots of vaulted ceilings and a fair amount of glass, it is not the most energy efficient house. I installed a 98% efficient furnace that cycles both the fan and the flame according to how much heat is needed about 5 years ago. Never-the-less, our gas bill averages about $150 a month in the winter and our electric bill almost doubles because the fan is running a lot of the time. We also have gas hot water, but we cook with electric.

In an effort to conserve energy, I am gradually switching over to LED lighting wherever possible. We replaced all the windows in the house several years back with energy efficient ones. That was a killer expense since we have 30 windows in our house.
Should have kept the wooden windows.  
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LittleJ
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« Reply #36 on: December 27, 2012, 05:28:34 PM »

I got shot. What is the safest way to remove the bullet?
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The True Adonis
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« Reply #37 on: December 27, 2012, 05:29:19 PM »

I like Natural Gas/Forced Air more, and it's cheaper where I live but I believe electric heat is 100% efficient.
Efficient as far as energy put in, translating directly to heat then I agree it is 100 percent.  However, when it comes to cost or power savings, Natural Gas may be a better option.  Also, I think there are too many variables to have a one solution fits all.

Perhaps electric heat might be decent for a thin walled shitbox code word for "green" and "eco-friendly", but I don`t think its the best for all houses.
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The True Adonis
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« Reply #38 on: December 27, 2012, 05:30:25 PM »

I got shot. What is the safest way to remove the bullet?
You might be able to leave it in.  Andrew Jackson left his bullet in as did countless war veterans.
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Roger Bacon
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« Reply #39 on: December 27, 2012, 05:33:22 PM »

Efficient as far as energy put in, translating directly to heat then I agree it is 100 percent.  However, when it comes to cost or power savings, Natural Gas may be a better option.  Also, I think there are too many variables to have a one solution fits all.

Perhaps electric heat might be decent for a thin walled shitbox code word for "green" and "eco-friendly", but I don`t think its the best for all houses.

Good post, makes sense.  I put electric baseboard heat in a finished attic but I'd really like to eventually get a bigger furnace (I think the A/C unit is big enough already) and get duct work run up there.

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The True Adonis
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« Reply #40 on: December 27, 2012, 05:37:06 PM »

Good post, makes sense.  I put electric baseboard heat in a finished attic but I'd really like to eventually get a bigger furnace (I think the A/C unit is big enough already) and get duct work run up there.


Thats a good idea with the baseboard heat for the meanwhile and you can keep it afterwards installed if you do get a new furnace. 
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Primemuscle
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« Reply #41 on: December 28, 2012, 12:17:39 AM »

Should have kept the wooden windows.  

Had they been made of wood, I might have done so. The original windows were anodized aluminum. Most were single pane glass. There was a variety of added aluminum storms windows. The replacement windows are dual pane with argon gas and low E. Not only do they make our home warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer, they insulate for sound transmission from the outside. There was nothing about the old windows that made them valuable.
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anabolichalo
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« Reply #42 on: December 28, 2012, 02:43:58 AM »

heh... it's hot again

apparently it just went cold because it was night


so now this pin doesnt matter if it's in or out i think


this heater is going to keep burning no matter what



guess i'm gonna need to hire some scambag plumber
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Primemuscle
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« Reply #43 on: December 28, 2012, 04:36:46 PM »

heh... it's hot again

apparently it just went cold because it was night


so now this pin doesnt matter if it's in or out i think


this heater is going to keep burning no matter what



guess i'm gonna need to hire some scambag plumber

You live in an apartment building, right? The reason it went cold at night is because the boilers likely go down at night. It seem obvious that your radiator valve doesn't completely shut off. This is a fairly common problem. Also, even if you could shut the radiator down, there would still be hot water in the pipes. If the boilers are running, you are always going to get some radiant heat. This is one of the issues with large buildings with a single heat source.

My daughter once lived in a very nice town home which was built in the 1940's each group of 6 to 10 units were on a single boiler in a common basement. My daughter who likes the temperature on the cool side, simply opened windows to control the heat. Obviously the thermostat didn't do what it was meant to do. These were radiant hot water baseboard heaters controlled by one thermostat in the dining room of the unit.
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anabolichalo
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« Reply #44 on: December 28, 2012, 04:40:01 PM »

it's odd tho, my other heaters are cold, they all have a different type of cap

so i guess therein lies the problem

gotta hire my buddies dad to fix this i suppose
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