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Author Topic: Calf development  (Read 1408 times)
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Getbig II
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« on: August 12, 2006, 02:29:48 AM »

Hi everyone,

I have an issue with symmetry in my calves...Both heads of the calf are clearly visible in my non-dominant side whereas my dominant leg has more of a bulky look with no head separation. I don't do any single leg calf work so I can't see how this has happened (I am conscious of using one leg more than the other during sets). Is it possible that it is genetic or is it likely I'm just favouring one side? Just wondered if anyone else has had this problem or just generally what everyone does for calves. I currently train them 3 times a week with 3 x standing calve raises and 3 x seated calf raises.

Any help would be great...thanks
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dan18
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« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2006, 05:59:41 AM »

Hi everyone,

I have an issue with symmetry in my calves...Both heads of the calf are clearly visible in my non-dominant side whereas my dominant leg has more of a bulky look with no head separation. I don't do any single leg calf work so I can't see how this has happened (I am conscious of using one leg more than the other during sets). Is it possible that it is genetic or is it likely I'm just favouring one side? Just wondered if anyone else has had this problem or just generally what everyone does for calves. I currently train them 3 times a week with 3 x standing calve raises and 3 x seated calf raises.

Any help would be great...thanks
my inner calf muscle is larger than the outer you must do sets in three positions..
toes pointed inward
toes pointed outward
toes pointed frontward but genetics will always determine growth
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p
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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2006, 06:42:47 AM »

my inner calf muscle is larger than the outer you must do sets in three positions..
toes pointed inward
toes pointed outward
toes pointed frontward but genetics will always determine growth

To add:

Toes Inward: Outer calf
Toes Outward: Inner calf
Toes Forward: Overall

Also, what I am going to do for calves from next week is train them every day I am training (6 days.) Probably between Seated calf raises, standing calf raises and one other. I tried leg press calf raises, but didn't get a great flex, so might see what else there is and do that. I believe in giving everything a ago. Good luck!
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pumpster
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2006, 06:50:44 AM »

It's mainly a preference based on being right or left handed but genetics also play a role.

Try some of the following:

-With two-legged calf work, deliberately lean on the problem leg to give it more work, and in some sets point the toe in and out to hit different areas you'd like to address.

-Do some extra one-leg work.


Also keep in mind that they don't have to be the same; might not be possible anyway plus you're likely noticing it more than others would. Schwarzenegger's biceps had different shapes and no one cared.
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JPM
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« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2006, 09:22:00 AM »

Actually favoring one leg over the other in normal (two legged) calf raises can lead to bad habits when exercising. And as stated, you are conscious of using one leg more than the other. Deliberately leaning on one leg to give it more work is not the way to go. Might try a better focus on the calves for awhile,  using single  legged calf work. This will insure an equal work load on each calf, which inturn can give a more muscular balance. Of course, by nature, one side (usually the dominate side) can be a little larger than the other. Might avoid two legged calf work of any kind (for awhile) and just do the better focused single leg calf work. One of the better calf devlopers is the one legged calf raise on a high block, holding a DB in hand. Try for speed and a full contraction of the calf at the top position. You will not need any extra calf work.

Turning the toes in or out has had a negative affect on some trainee's knees/joints. May not be the wisest way to do the calf raises if a potentional injury is to be avoided, for some people. A natural position of the toe settings can give better development anyway, if worked hard and often. Good Luck.
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