Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums
March 24, 2017, 09:31:48 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 302 303 [304]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Mature thread  (Read 56625 times)
DroppingPlates
Competitors II
Getbig V
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 42606


Gimmicks are cowards and cowards aren't true men


WWW
« Reply #7575 on: September 06, 2016, 04:11:52 PM »

JUST TURNED 48 IN JULY...

Italians look good at any age..
Report to moderator   Logged
njflex
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 26964


TEAM...NUTZ...THE PIC...


« Reply #7576 on: September 06, 2016, 06:50:43 PM »

Italians look good at any age..
Cool,,thanks man,,,
Report to moderator   Logged
Charlys69
Getbig III
***
Posts: 720


« Reply #7577 on: September 10, 2016, 09:16:10 AM »

next month 53.........Holiday pic from 3 days ago in Thailand. 6 "2" (190 cm), 117 kg act. 258 lbs.


* SAM_4174.JPG (44.19 KB, 576x292 - viewed 1286 times.)
Report to moderator   Logged
Charlys69
Getbig III
***
Posts: 720


« Reply #7578 on: September 19, 2016, 11:28:00 AM »

2 weeks later "back" at home....


* SAM_4502.JPG (14.13 KB, 350x205 - viewed 511 times.)

* SAM_0534.JPG (42.43 KB, 639x470 - viewed 118 times.)
Report to moderator   Logged
oldtimer1
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 7728

Getbig!


« Reply #7579 on: March 06, 2017, 07:48:42 PM »

Concerned about joint health after lifting for over 40 years. At 50 except for aches and pains, everything was full steam ahead. Now as I get close to 60 it seems I have to be careful about joint health. How many guys have bad shoulders, knees elbows and backs? Seems like joints go on every famous lifter.  Guys like Paul Anderson, Grimek, and even Clarence Bass had bad hips. The guys who had destroyed shoulders is a huge list. So many older athletes are going for surgical repairs and joint replacements.

Seems guys that trained for volume with moderate weight seemed to have the best joints but I have no real scientific proof of this. Just empirical knowledge being in the gyms. Guys like Robby Robinson seem injury free for a life time but then again guys like Chris Dickerson has a lot of joint issues.

What's your opinion on training hard but safe for an older trainer?  Some say you should train with volume and train a body part 2 to 3 times a weeks with moderate weights. Exhausting the muscle through "endurance" type lifting of multiple sets and short rests.  Making a light weight heavy so to speak through short rests between sets.

Keeping with the volume opinion I heard one well built older natural guys say high reps. He does from what I can see about 3 to 4 exercises per body part. He does 3 sets per exercise of around 12 to 15 reps.  Short rests between exercises keeps the weights very moderate.  His full range and moderate rep cadence seems to be a safe way of training.

Another view point is this 73 year old guy that who body builds with with heavy weights in my gym. His opinion was to train each body part once a week so it can heal and repair. When he trained a body part more than once a week directly he said he would feel joint pain.  He said in effect, lift heavy with low sets and forget about hitting that body part again till next week. He uses a rep range of 6 to 8 reps. Maybe 2 sets per exercise. This is how I currently train. Split my body in a three ways and train 3 days a week.

I guess we all have to do what suits us. Any thoughts on this? I'm not looking for a debate on volume vs HIT but what an old natural guy should do to protect his joints. My knee and shoulder is giving me a lot of aggravation. One thing for sure. If an exercise hurts then find a substitute. Don't keep doing it because it's thought of as a necessary exercise. I think all inclines chest exercises are out for me. Just hits my painful shoulder bad. In my mind I feel because of all the decades of reading about chest training that inclines are a necessity for upper chest development.  I now think that's BS.  Flat dumbbells bench and declines don't hurt my shoulder so that's what I'm going to do.
Report to moderator   Logged
DroppingPlates
Competitors II
Getbig V
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 42606


Gimmicks are cowards and cowards aren't true men


WWW
« Reply #7580 on: March 11, 2017, 06:05:32 PM »

Greetings Oldtimer,

Many things have already been written on safe/joint friendly weight training, such as exercise selection and the importance of proper form.

I give you 3 things that work very well for me during times of injuries/pains (shoulders & hips in my case), and with 'very well' I mean that I was
(almost) able to train pain free and that the pain post-workout was much less.

1. Perform dynamic mobility work and stretches for at least 30 minutes once a week. Right after cardio is a good moment, as long as you're warmed up.
2. Train with resistance bands or combine them with free weights or machines. Esp pressing movements with bands put less stress on the joints.
3. Train in super slow fashion. The original super slow protocol is 4 reps with a 10 sec concentric & 10 sec eccentric movement, so that's a total T.U.T. of 80 seconds(!)
This works very well, but I found out that 3 reps with a 5 sec concentric/5 sec eccentric works more intense (i.e. more weight moved per second, while it's still not taxing too much on my joints)

I believe that the preferred volume/frequency is personal thing. Myself, I prefer a limited volume with a higher frequency (train a muscle 3 times per 2 weeks), but you also have those typical volume guys who want to pump blood into the muscle from all angles. What matters the most is that you take enough recovery time, which is mostly a matter of listening to the signals of your body.
Report to moderator   Logged
njflex
Competitors
Getbig V
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 26964


TEAM...NUTZ...THE PIC...


« Reply #7581 on: March 14, 2017, 08:00:08 AM »

Greetings Oldtimer,

Many things have already been written on safe/joint friendly weight training, such as exercise selection and the importance of proper form.

I give you 3 things that work very well for me during times of injuries/pains (shoulders & hips in my case), and with 'very well' I mean that I was
(almost) able to train pain free and that the pain post-workout was much less.

1. Perform dynamic mobility work and stretches for at least 30 minutes once a week. Right after cardio is a good moment, as long as you're warmed up.
2. Train with resistance bands or combine them with free weights or machines. Esp pressing movements with bands put less stress on the joints.
3. Train in super slow fashion. The original super slow protocol is 4 reps with a 10 sec concentric & 10 sec eccentric movement, so that's a total T.U.T. of 80 seconds(!)
This works very well, but I found out that 3 reps with a 5 sec concentric/5 sec eccentric works more intense (i.e. more weight moved per second, while it's still not taxing too much on my joints)

I believe that the preferred volume/frequency is personal thing. Myself, I prefer a limited volume with a higher frequency (train a muscle 3 times per 2 weeks), but you also have those typical volume guys who want to pump blood into the muscle from all angles. What matters the most is that you take enough recovery time, which is mostly a matter of listening to the signals of your body.
nice,,,
Report to moderator   Logged
oldtimer1
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 7728

Getbig!


« Reply #7582 on: March 14, 2017, 10:39:46 AM »

Greetings Oldtimer,

Many things have already been written on safe/joint friendly weight training, such as exercise selection and the importance of proper form.

I give you 3 things that work very well for me during times of injuries/pains (shoulders & hips in my case), and with 'very well' I mean that I was
(almost) able to train pain free and that the pain post-workout was much less.

1. Perform dynamic mobility work and stretches for at least 30 minutes once a week. Right after cardio is a good moment, as long as you're warmed up.
2. Train with resistance bands or combine them with free weights or machines. Esp pressing movements with bands put less stress on the joints.
3. Train in super slow fashion. The original super slow protocol is 4 reps with a 10 sec concentric & 10 sec eccentric movement, so that's a total T.U.T. of 80 seconds(!)
This works very well, but I found out that 3 reps with a 5 sec concentric/5 sec eccentric works more intense (i.e. more weight moved per second, while it's still not taxing too much on my joints)

I believe that the preferred volume/frequency is personal thing. Myself, I prefer a limited volume with a higher frequency (train a muscle 3 times per 2 weeks), but you also have those typical volume guys who want to pump blood into the muscle from all angles. What matters the most is that you take enough recovery time, which is mostly a matter of listening to the signals of your body.

Good advice to train with a slow cadence. I remember when Ken Hutchins first came forth with super slow training as he called it and modified Arthur Jones cam on his Med X machines. I was a lot younger when this came out and I laughed at his protocol of super slow reps. I wrote back in the day it might be a great method for rehabilitation and for older trainers but not for the masses of hard core trainers.  Now I'm an older trainer and I'm not laughing.
Report to moderator   Logged
DroppingPlates
Competitors II
Getbig V
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 42606


Gimmicks are cowards and cowards aren't true men


WWW
« Reply #7583 on: March 14, 2017, 02:51:16 PM »

Good advice to train with a slow cadence. I remember when Ken Hutchins first came forth with super slow training as he called it and modified Arthur Jones cam on his Med X machines. I was a lot younger when this came out and I laughed at his protocol of super slow reps. I wrote back in the day it might be a great method for rehabilitation and for older trainers but not for the masses of hard core trainers.  Now I'm an older trainer and I'm not laughing.

You know your stuff! Yes, I was referring to Ken Hutchins' super slow protocol. It's mentally a tough way to train, since you almost need to 'reprogram' your muscles but it results in a great mind muscle connection and the stress on the joints is so much less.
Report to moderator   Logged
oldtimer1
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 7728

Getbig!


« Reply #7584 on: March 16, 2017, 05:25:17 AM »

On another note when ever I saw a picture of Ken Hutchins he looked out of shape. I mean out of shape for a non trainer.  Maybe he had health issues?  Lifting today. I won't be pretty. LOL.
Report to moderator   Logged
DroppingPlates
Competitors II
Getbig V
******
Gender: Male
Posts: 42606


Gimmicks are cowards and cowards aren't true men


WWW
« Reply #7585 on: March 16, 2017, 05:57:50 AM »

On another note when ever I saw a picture of Ken Hutchins he looked out of shape. I mean out of shape for a non trainer.  Maybe he had health issues?  Lifting today. I won't be pretty. LOL.

I hear you, and generally I would rather listen to someone who followed his own advises with good results. However, I've seen plenty of PT's/coaches/trainers who look good themselves but who have no basic understanding about training/nutrition and/or have no mentor or social skills.
No matter what type of professional someone is, at the end of the day it's someone's track record that brings value to the table.
Report to moderator   Logged
oldtimer1
Getbig V
*****
Posts: 7728

Getbig!


« Reply #7586 on: March 16, 2017, 04:26:41 PM »

My workout was with relatively light weights today. I really believe an IV antibiotic known for harming tendons while I was in the hospital with pneumonia contributed to my current injuries.  My wife said to stop being aggravated that the alternative could have been death.  Lost so much weight.  Tried to protect my shoulder and knee. Funny dips don't hurt the shoulder but incline presses both bar and dumbbell kill my shoulder. Knee is making a lot of funky noises. Hurts the most in the back of the knee. Wonder if a hamstring pull contributed to this? First hurt it sprinting. I didn't go super slow but used a controlled cadence with full a full range motion. Certain movements are out for now. Leg curls, inclines, and pull ups are definitely out. Last time I did a pull up I saw white lightening pain in the shoulder. Orthopedic surgeon said I have a slap tear but it's in the best possible position to have it.(What ever that means)  He said let it rest for 3 months and if it's still giving me trouble he would operate.  Here I am ignoring his advise. LOL.

Back and chest.


Pull down 2 x 10 120lbs( my home unit has so much friction a little weight feels like a lot. )
Seated cable lat pulls with V handle 2 x 12 165LBS.
One arm dumbbell rows with knee on bench 2 x 10 80lbs
Barbell row 2 x 10 140lbs. ( old school style with body parallel to the floor.)

Dumbbell flat bench 2 x 70lbs (all the way down and up. Controlled movement to protect bad shoulder)
Weighted dips 2 x 10 10lbs (again slow all the way down and up)
Flat flies 2 x 10 45lbs
Push ups 2 x 27-17 (chest tapping floor, body straight and all the way up)

deadlifts 2 x 4 285lbs then 1 x 1 310lbs. ( being careful with the knee. Controlled reps)
Weighted lower back hyper extensions 2 x 15 25lbs plate behind head. (felts slight pain behind bad knee)

Ab wheel roll out 2 x 18
flat crunch with feet on bench 1 x 55 10lbs plate behind head.

Disappointed in pressing weight and my inability to do inclines.  Legs are the next workout. Have to be really careful with the knee. Instead of starting with moderate weight squats I'm going to start with full range leg presses after a lot of warm ups. Hopefully when I get to squats the knee will be ready to go with moderate weights.  
Report to moderator   Logged
Pages: 1 ... 302 303 [304]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Theme created by Egad Community. Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!