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Author Topic: Police State - Official Thread  (Read 97447 times)
Jack T. Cross
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« Reply #975 on: January 30, 2013, 04:41:27 PM »

I suspect that at some point privacy considerations will come into play. Of course, the American people have repeatedly shown that they care little about their privacy, willingly providing massive amounts of personal information to Facebook, Google and Apple and allowing the Federal Government to collect just about every bit of information in the name of security. So who knows, maybe I'm wrong.

Just so there's absolutely no confusion, you would agree, the fact that some individuals have chosen to share information doesn't in any way justify a state of routine surveillance, and the two are completely separate issues, right?
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« Reply #976 on: January 30, 2013, 05:24:39 PM »

Just so there's absolutely no confusion, you would agree, the fact that some individuals have chosen to share information doesn't in any way justify a state of routine surveillance, and the two are completely separate issues, right?

Of course. I was making a separate point. I was saying that I'm sure at some point the capabilities of drones will reach a point where people will start to have concerns about their privacy. I made a sidebar that I had thought that privacy concerns would have kept things like Facebook and TSA virtual strip searches from ever taking off, but that it seems that Americans, generally speaking, don't really value privacy.
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Jack T. Cross
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« Reply #977 on: January 30, 2013, 07:28:35 PM »

Of course. I was making a separate point. I was saying that I'm sure at some point the capabilities of drones will reach a point where people will start to have concerns about their privacy. I made a sidebar that I had thought that privacy concerns would have kept things like Facebook and TSA virtual strip searches from ever taking off, but that it seems that Americans, generally speaking, don't really value privacy.

So when you say this:

"spy drones" don't worry me too much.

What part is it, of devices that could likely turn a society into a state of routine surveillance, that allows you to remain unconcerned?  Or is it that you're only unconcerned about them providing what would be redundant visual information, as you originally stated?
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« Reply #978 on: January 30, 2013, 08:11:04 PM »

So when you say this:

What part is it, of devices that could likely turn a society into a state of routine surveillance, that allows you to remain unconcerned?  Or is it that you're only unconcerned about them providing what would be redundant visual information, as you originally stated?

Because, as I explained, I do not believe that drones, at this point in time, are likely to be used in a privacy-violating manner within the continental United States, even if they were to be relatively widely deployed. At this point in time (and with their current capabilities) they are ineffective tools for the creation of a surveillance society and not particularly better than other existing methods, such as orbital platforms and closed-circuit TV cameras. Much bigger and more realistic threats to privacy exist right now. For example, the Government has been demand increased access to and control of the Internet, including insisting that backdoors be incorporated into software and hardware communications products (e.g. CALEA) to allow for efficient interception of traffic by its representatives.

And since I am orders of magnitude more likely to have my personal and private information intercepted as it flows over the Internet and/or is stored on various online service providers, than to have it intercepted by drones flying overhead (at least as of this moment), I am sure that you will understand why drones aren't really high on my list of priorities when it comes to privacy.
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« Reply #979 on: January 30, 2013, 08:16:39 PM »

Because, as I explained, I do not believe that drones, at this point in time, are likely to be used in a privacy-violating manner within the continental United States, even if they were to be relatively widely deployed. At this point in time (and with their current capabilities) they are ineffective tools for the creation of a surveillance society and not particularly better than other existing methods, such as orbital platforms and closed-circuit TV cameras. Much bigger and more realistic threats to privacy exist right now. For example, the Government has been demand increased access to and control of the Internet, including insisting that backdoors be incorporated into software and hardware communications products (e.g. CALEA) to allow for efficient interception of traffic by its representatives.

And since I am orders of magnitude more likely to have my personal and private information intercepted as it flows over the Internet and/or is stored on various online service providers, than to have it intercepted by drones flying overhead (at least as of this moment), I am sure that you will understand why drones aren't really high on my list of priorities when it comes to privacy.

I sure do think they will... Are they the top of the list on privacy concerns? Probably not, but they will most likely be used to circumvent your privacy quite quickly.
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« Reply #980 on: January 30, 2013, 08:27:34 PM »

I sure do think they will... Are they the top of the list on privacy concerns? Probably not, but they will most likely be used to circumvent your privacy quite quickly.

I don't disagree - I just think we need to prioritize. And drones just aren't high on my list at this point.
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« Reply #981 on: January 30, 2013, 08:31:38 PM »

And that ATF story i posted?
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« Reply #982 on: January 30, 2013, 08:33:57 PM »

And that ATF story i posted?

I must have missed that - what was it about?
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« Reply #983 on: January 30, 2013, 08:39:55 PM »

Skip to comments.
ATF's Milwaukee sting operation marred by mistakes, failures
 http://www.jsonline.com/watchdog/watchdogreports/atfs-milwaukee-sting-operation-marred-by-mistakes-failures-mu8akpj-188952581.html ^ | 30 jan 2013 | John Diedrich and Raquel Rutledge
 
Posted on Wednesday, January 30, 2013 2:47:13 PM by rellimpank

. A store calling itself Fearless Distributing opened early last year on an out-of-the-way street in Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood, offering designer clothes, athletic shoes, jewelry and drug paraphernalia.

Those working behind the counter, however, weren't interested in selling anything.

They were undercover agents from the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives running a storefront sting aimed at busting criminal operations in the city by purchasing drugs and guns from felons.

But the effort to date has not snared any major dealers or taken down a gang. Instead, it resulted in a string of mistakes and failures, including an ATF military-style machine gun landing on the streets of Milwaukee and the agency having $35,000 in merchandise stolen from its store, a Journal Sentinel investigation has found.

When the 10-month operation was shut down after the burglary, agents and Milwaukee police officers who participated in the sting cleared out the store but left behind a sensitive document that listed names, vehicles and phone numbers of undercover agents.

And the agency remains locked in a battle with the building's owner, who says he is owed about $15,000 because of utility bills, holes in the walls, broken doors and damage from an overflowing toilet.

The sting resulted in charges being filed against about 30 people, most for low-level drug sales and gun possession counts. But agents had the wrong person in at least three cases. In one, they charged a man who was in prison - as a result of an earlier ATF case - at the time agents said he was selling drugs to them.


(Excerpt) Read more at jsonline.com ...


bmp
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« Reply #984 on: January 30, 2013, 08:42:12 PM »

Fun...
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Jack T. Cross
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« Reply #985 on: January 30, 2013, 11:07:05 PM »

Because, as I explained, I do not believe that drones, at this point in time, are likely to be used in a privacy-violating manner within the continental United States, even if they were to be relatively widely deployed. At this point in time (and with their current capabilities) they are ineffective tools for the creation of a surveillance society and not particularly better than other existing methods, such as orbital platforms and closed-circuit TV cameras. Much bigger and more realistic threats to privacy exist right now. For example, the Government has been demand(ing) increased access to and control of the Internet, including insisting that backdoors be incorporated into software and hardware communications products (e.g. CALEA) to allow for efficient interception of traffic by its representatives.

To be exact, this involves third-party traces of surveillance, in comparison to something that would conceivably bypass such traces.

And since I am orders of magnitude more likely to have my personal and private information intercepted as it flows over the Internet and/or is stored on various online service providers, than to have it intercepted by drones flying overhead (at least as of this moment), I am sure that you will understand why drones aren't really high on my list of priorities when it comes to privacy.

So it only makes a statement about the present, to say that you're unconcerned about drones, and not the future.  Isn't that true?
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« Reply #986 on: January 31, 2013, 12:51:09 PM »

Lake Stevens pays couple $100,000 after police force way into home.

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2020235617_lakestevenssettlementxml.html

The article is quite a read... and those two idiots will remain police officers. Just amazing.
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« Reply #987 on: January 31, 2013, 03:39:59 PM »


John P. Martin and Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS

 Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2013, 9:45 AM




Nine current or former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges were charged today with conspiracy and fraud after a three-year FBI probe into ticket-fixing in the beleaguered court.
 
A 77-count indictment, returned Tuesday but sealed until Thursday, said judges or their assistants routinely shredded documents, used code words and practiced "a well-understood conspiracy of silence" that turned the court into two systems: One where the average citizen paid for infractions, while connected offenders were found not guilty or saw their cases dismissed, costing the Commonwealth an untold amount.
 
"For years, even beyond the conspiracy charged, there existed a culture of ticket fixing at Traffic Court," the indictment said. "The ticket fixing was pervasive and frequent."
 
Charged were two of the court's three sitting judges, Michael Lowry and Michael Sullivan, as well as seven former judges.
 
Four - Fortunato Perri Sr., Robert Mulgrew, Willie Singletary and Thomasine Tynes - were elected by Philadelphia voters. The other three are former suburban district judges who were appointed for a stints in Philadelphia Traffic Court: Mark A. Bruno of a Chester County, H. Warren Hogeland of Bucks County, and Kenneth Miller of Delaware County.


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Unlike those who were indicted Thursday, Hogeland, Miller and Perri were charged separately by informations. The process is typically reserved for defendants who intend to plead guilty.
 
Also indicted were Traffic Court administrator William Hird; and two local businessmen, Henry P. Alfano and Robert Moy. Alfano owned a towing service that won a no-bid contract from traffic court.
 
U.S. Attorney Zane D. Memeger said the system cheated taxpayers of revenue and completely undermined public confidence in the institution.
 
"Those who seek to game the system by refusing to follow the rules need to be held accountable by the rule of law they swore to uphold," he said in a statement.
 
All but one of the defendants named in the indictment appeared before a magistrate judge and were expected to be released under $20,000 bail.
 
"I'm so upset," said Tynes, as she left Magistrate Judge L. Felipe Restrepo's courtroom. "I don't know nothing really."
 
The others mostly deferred to their lawyers, who denied any wrongdoing and looked forward to their day in court.
 
"Judge Sullivan never asked for nor did he receive any bribe, kickback or anything of value in exchange for performing his duties as an elected traffic court judge," defense attorney Henry E. Hockeimer Jr. said in a statement. "Judge Sullivan handled each case before him fairly and competently."
 
Singletary's lawyer, William J. Brennan, said he was pleased after such an exhaustive investigation to see that "the indictment does not allege that my client took one thin dime of graft or payola."
 
Still, the case in a single day decimated the bench and cast a cloud that stretched years. The Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts pledged support to keep the traffic court running.
 
"Philadelphia Traffic Court remains open and newly-assigned senior magisterial district judges from various counties have been appointed to hear cases," Justice J. Michael Eakin said in a statement.
 
As to suspending the judges, Jim Koval, a spokesman for the Supreme Court, said Thursday that he could not comment about the two Philadelphia judges' status. Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer, appointed to oversee and reform Traffic Court, said he has requested that Sullivan and Lowry be suspended, and has not scheduled them to hear cases.
 
In Chester County, the president judge issued an order barring Bruno from serving as a magistrate - or even entering his office.
 
The state Judicial Conduct Board, meanwhile, filed petitions to suspend without pay all the active judges until pending resolution of the federal case.
 
Kathleen D. Wilkinson, chairwoman of the 13,000-member Philadelphia Bar Association, called Thursday "a sad day for the justice system in Pennsylvania."
 
Wilkinson said the indictments "cast a shadow on the court that compromises the ability for justice to be dispensed fairly," and she called on the indicted justices to resign immediately.
 
"We respect the work done by Traffic Court Administrative Judge Gary S. Glazer to enact measures to restore integrity and public confidence in the operations of the court, and believe an overhaul of Traffic Court is needed so that justice is dispensed fairly and without favoritism," Wilkinson said.
 
For decades, traffic court has stirred controversy, seen as a scourge by drivers, a patronage mill by political observers, and ripe for corruption. Judges earn at least $85,000, win election only with the blessing of the local political parties and bosses. The court was twice before been the focus of federal probes.
 
The latest charges brought to light a probe that had been bubbling for at least three years, built on public raids and secret FBI wiretaps.
 
A preview emerged last fall, when a consultant commissioned by Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille concluded there was a pervasive culture of corruption in the court.
 
That report, prepared by former city prosecutor William G. Chadwick, cited eight former or current judges, and described Hird as the central coordinator for ticket-fixing, or, as the judges called it "consideration."
 
The indictment went further, spelling out in detail how friends, associates and ward leaders arranged to get cases dismissed or fines dropped.
 
In return, the judges allegedly got more than good will. According to the indictment, Perri accepted free auto services, towing, landscaping, and even a load of shrimp and crab cakes from Alfano, whose company, Century Motors, ran a towing service.
 
"I see Century on it, it's gold," Perri once told Alfano, according to the indictment. "When you call, I move, brother, believe me."
 
In February 2010, the indictment said, Alfano called on behalf of a truck driver who faced $442 in fines and court costs after being ticketed along I-95 for not clearing the snow and ice off his tractor-trailer. Twice the drive got notices that his license would be suspended.
 
"It will be alright, don't worry about it," Perri allegedly assured Alfano.
 
Two months later, the case landed before Sullivan. The driver didn't even attend the hearing, and was deemed not guilty, the indictment said.
 
Hird declined to comment but his lawyer, Greg Pagano, told reporters: "My client is a taxpaying, hardworking citizen who goes to work every day and who is being indicted essentially for doing his job."
 
Alfano is a former police officer who had a long-standing friendship with Perri, according to one of his lawyers. The suggestions of payoffs for ticket fixing was "a reach," said the lawyer, Jeffrey Miller.
 
Hird and Singletary are accused of lying to FBI agents, while Mulgrew, Tynes and Lowry are charged with perjury before the Grand Jury.
 
"You don't give out special favors, is that right?" a prosecutor asked Lowry before the grand jury in fall 2011, according to the indictment.
 
"No, I treat everybody the same," he replied.
 
Singletary resigned last year in an unrelated scandal, after a court staffer accused him of showing her a picture of his genitals on his cellphone.
 
Mulgrew was indicted in a separate federal corruption case, charged with defrauding an neighborhood nonprofit.
 
The Republican floor leader of the state Senate, Dominic Pileggi of Delaware County, said the indictments boosted his resolve to pass legislation abolishing the court.
 
"They confirm my opinion that the Traffic Court is not an institution that has any reason to continue to exist," Pileggi told reporters in a conference call. "They accelerate the urgency of enacting the reforms that I proposed."


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« Reply #988 on: January 31, 2013, 05:11:26 PM »

Lake Stevens pays couple $100,000 after police force way into home.

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2020235617_lakestevenssettlementxml.html

The article is quite a read... and those two idiots will remain police officers. Just amazing.
Holy shit... My great aunt lives in/on lake Stevens...
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« Reply #989 on: February 01, 2013, 07:40:05 AM »

Lake Stevens pays couple $100,000 after police force way into home.

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2020235617_lakestevenssettlementxml.html

The article is quite a read... and those two idiots will remain police officers. Just amazing.

They should not have settled.
And those cops should rot in jail.
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« Reply #990 on: February 01, 2013, 08:03:01 AM »


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2984171/posts





A bipartisan push intensified Thursday for answers from the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives about a flawed storefront sting in Milwaukee.

A Journal Sentinel investigation this week exposed a 10-month federal operation marred by a series of mistakes and failures, including an agent's machine gun being stolen and burglars ripping off $35,000 in merchandise from the agency's phony store. Milwaukee police and ATF are still looking for that stolen machine gun, officials said Thursday.

"Suffice to say, ATF and the police department both have a keen interest in trying to get that firearm back," said Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn.

Mayor Tom Barrett joined the call for an investigation and two letters were sent to the ATF's acting director, one from a group of powerful lawmakers and another from U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.).

The seven-page letter by four leading members of Congress called the flawed sting "disturbing" and asked acting director B. Todd Jones for written answers to more than two dozen questions related to the operation, dubbed "Fearless Distributing."

As a result of the sting, about 30 people were charged in federal and state court, most with low-level drug and gun counts. In at least three cases, the newspaper found, agents recommended charges against the wrong person, including a man who was in prison on a previous ATF case at the time he was accused of selling them drugs. The operation seized 145 guns.

"ATF must have rigorous oversight plans to ensure that these operations are conducted carefully," the letter from the four congressmen said. "Such management controls and rigorous oversight plans appear to have been absent during the botched Fearless Distributing case. Although not surprising, it is unacceptable."

The letter was signed by U.S. Rep. James Sensenbrenner, (R-Wis.) chairman of the House Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations; U.S. Sen. Charles Grassley, (R-Iowa), the ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee; U.S. Rep. Darrell E. Issa, (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, the chamber's head investigative committee; and U.S. Rep. Robert Goodlatte (R-Va.), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee.

The lawmakers were among those who led the congressional probe into ATF's Fast and Furious operation in Arizona, where agents encouraged the sale of more than 2,000 firearms to traffickers by gun stores but lost track of the weapons. Many ended up at crime scenes in Mexico.
 
Sensitive document found

Separately Thursday, Barrett joined the call for an investigation into the operation, which included agents leaving an ATF operational plan at the store when they shut it down late last year. The document listed undercover agents' real names, vehicle descriptions, cellphone numbers and secret signals used when busting a suspect.

"Clearly, there is a need for an examination of what went wrong with this operation," said Barrett, a Democrat. "In particular, I am concerned about sloppiness with documents being left behind that potentially put people's lives in danger."

Two Milwaukee police officers worked with ATF agents on the effort, which was under the control of the agency's Milwaukee office.

Flynn called ATF a valuable partner in his department's efforts to get illegal guns off the street. He acknowledged the operation had problems and needs to be investigated.

However, Flynn said Congress has spent years damaging the ATF's ability to do its job by cutting funding and putting special restrictions on it that other agencies do not get.

"When you look at an agency over time, it requires consistent leadership. I don't think it is a shock that things may go wrong at the street level when there has been a willful attempt to undermine senior leadership to set a consistent direction. There is inevitably a domino effect," he said. "It is an operation where some things went wrong. Some things went right. Clearly better supervision would have been helpful."

President Barack Obama has nominated Jones to be permanent director. The agency has been without a director since 2006, when Congress passed a provision in the Patriot Act requiring the director to be confirmed. Sensenbrenner said he inserted the provision to bring the ATF in line with other agencies.

"All the other major law enforcement agencies had Senate-confirmed heads except the ATF," Sensenbrenner said in a written statement Thursday. "The goal was to give ATF more stature and credibility, and it was an attempt to strengthen the agency after some high-profile failures."

Barrett said the case shows the need for a permanent director to be confirmed by Congress.

On Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Gwen Moore (D-Wis.), called the effort a "failed operation" and also said the case shows the need to confirm Jones.

Barrett said politicians from both parties are going to use the blunders of this operation to make a point.

"There are critics of the ATF who are going to use this as an example of its failure, and there will be those who are concerned that ATF has been handcuffed and are going to use this to make the argument that you can't defund and take away powers from an agency, fail to confirm a permanent director and then complain that it's not doing its job," he said.

Johnson sent a separate letter to Jones expressing concern about the way the operation was handled and anger at how agents treated the owner of the building where they located their undercover storefront. Johnson said he contacted the agency more than two weeks ago after learning about the damage to property but never heard back.

"With the President calling on Congress to give BATF expansive new powers under a so-called assault weapons ban and other broad gun control measures, I believe it is incumbent on the BATF to fully explain why incidents of mismanagement, such as last year's events in Milwaukee, continue to occur," Johnson wrote.

ATF spokesman Special Agent Robert Schmidt did not return calls seeking comment Thursday. U.S. Attorney James Santelle, whose office was briefed on the Milwaukee sting before it was launched, could not be reached for comment.

Flynn said the operational goal was to seize illegal guns in Milwaukee from across the city, not necessarily in the Riverwest residential area where the store was located.

"This is an attempt by ATF to focus on the firearm," he said. "This effort is one tool of many."

Barrett said he was briefed about the operation last year. He was told the task force was targeting illegal guns, but not that it would be a storefront sting or where the operation would be located.
 
Residents angry

Several residents in the Riverwest neighborhood, where the store was set up in a former sign company building, are upset the agency brought drug dealers and gun-carrying felons to their neighborhood. They learned about the operation from the Journal Sentinel.

Barrett said he plans to meet with residents. He declined to comment on ATF's selection of a densely populated neighborhood for the storefront sting. The defendants in the criminal cases that were filed are all from outside the area of the store.

David Salkin, who unknowingly rented his building to the agency for its undercover operation, said the ATF owes him about $15,000 because of damage to his building, unpaid utility bills and lost rent. The agency contends the amount is much smaller.

An ATF attorney told Salkin to file a claim with the federal government and warned him to stop contacting the agency.

ATF attorney Patricia Cangemi wrote to Salkin, saying in part, "If you continue to contact the Agents after being so advised your contacts may be construed as harassment under the law. Threats or harassment of a Federal Agent is of grave concern."
 

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« Reply #991 on: February 01, 2013, 08:11:13 AM »

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/decorated-combat-veteran-arrested-in-new-york-charged-with-5-felonies-for-possession-of-ar-magazines_01312013


Here we go. 
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Jack T. Cross
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« Reply #992 on: February 01, 2013, 11:19:09 AM »

Lake Stevens pays couple $100,000 after police force way into home.

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2020235617_lakestevenssettlementxml.html

The article is quite a read... and those two idiots will remain police officers. Just amazing.

Wow.  That is one of strangest stories...
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« Reply #993 on: February 04, 2013, 09:14:30 AM »

Why Police Lie Under Oath
 
By MICHELLE ALEXANDER

 

THOUSANDS of people plead guilty to crimes every year in the United States because they know that the odds of a jury’s believing their word over a police officer’s are slim to none. As a juror, whom are you likely to believe: the alleged criminal in an orange jumpsuit or two well-groomed police officers in uniforms who just swore to God they’re telling the truth, the whole truth and nothing but? As one of my colleagues recently put it, “Everyone knows you have to be crazy to accuse the police of lying.”

But are police officers necessarily more trustworthy than alleged criminals? I think not. Not just because the police have a special inclination toward confabulation, but because, disturbingly, they have an incentive to lie. In this era of mass incarceration, the police shouldn’t be trusted any more than any other witness, perhaps less so.

That may sound harsh, but numerous law enforcement officials have put the matter more bluntly.  Peter Keane, a former San Francisco Police commissioner, wrote an article in The San Francisco Chronicle decrying a police culture that treats lying as the norm: “Police officer perjury in court to justify illegal dope searches is commonplace. One of the dirty little not-so-secret secrets of the criminal justice system is undercover narcotics officers intentionally lying under oath. It is a perversion of the American justice system that strikes directly at the rule of law. Yet it is the routine way of doing business in courtrooms everywhere in America.”

The New York City Police Department is not exempt from this critique. In 2011, hundreds of drug cases were dismissed after several police officers were accused of mishandling evidence. That year, Justice Gustin L. Reichbach of the State Supreme Court in Brooklyn condemned a widespread culture of lying and corruption in the department’s drug enforcement units. “I thought I was not naïve,” he said when announcing a guilty verdict involving a police detective who had planted crack cocaine on a pair of suspects. “But even this court was shocked, not only by the seeming pervasive scope of misconduct but even more distressingly by the seeming casualness by which such conduct is employed.”

Remarkably, New York City officers have been found to engage in patterns of deceit in cases involving charges as minor as trespass. In September it was reported that the Bronx district attorney’s office was so alarmed by police lying that it decided to stop prosecuting people who were stopped and arrested for trespassing at public housing projects, unless prosecutors first interviewed the arresting officer to ensure the arrest was actually warranted. Jeannette Rucker, the chief of arraignments for the Bronx district attorney, explained in a letter that it had become apparent that the police were arresting people even when there was convincing evidence that they were innocent. To justify the arrests, Ms. Rucker claimed, police officers provided false written statements, and in depositions, the arresting officers gave false testimony.

Mr. Keane, in his Chronicle article, offered two major reasons the police lie so much. First, because they can. Police officers “know that in a swearing match between a drug defendant and a police officer, the judge always rules in favor of the officer.” At worst, the case will be dismissed, but the officer is free to continue business as usual. Second, criminal defendants are typically poor and uneducated, often belong to a racial minority, and often have a criminal record.  “Police know that no one cares about these people,” Mr. Keane explained.

All true, but there is more to the story than that.

Police departments have been rewarded in recent years for the sheer numbers of stops, searches and arrests. In the war on drugs, federal grant programs like the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program have encouraged state and local law enforcement agencies to boost drug arrests in order to compete for millions of dollars in funding. Agencies receive cash rewards for arresting high numbers of people for drug offenses, no matter how minor the offenses or how weak the evidence. Law enforcement has increasingly become a numbers game. And as it has, police officers’ tendency to regard procedural rules as optional and to lie and distort the facts has grown as well. Numerous scandals involving police officers lying or planting drugs — in Tulia, Tex. and Oakland, Calif., for example — have been linked to federally funded drug task forces eager to keep the cash rolling in.

THE pressure to boost arrest numbers is not limited to drug law enforcement. Even where no clear financial incentives exist, the “get tough” movement has warped police culture to such a degree that police chiefs and individual officers feel pressured to meet stop-and-frisk or arrest quotas in order to prove their “productivity.”

For the record, the New York City police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, denies that his department has arrest quotas. Such denials are mandatory, given that quotas are illegal under state law. But as the Urban Justice Center’s Police Reform Organizing Project has documented, numerous officers have contradicted Mr. Kelly. In 2010, a New York City police officer named Adil Polanco told a local ABC News reporter that “our primary job is not to help anybody, our primary job is not to assist anybody, our primary job is to get those numbers and come back with them.” He continued: “At the end of the night you have to come back with something.  You have to write somebody, you have to arrest somebody, even if the crime is not committed, the number’s there. So our choice is to come up with the number.”

Exposing police lying is difficult largely because it is rare for the police to admit their own lies or to acknowledge the lies of other officers. This reluctance derives partly from the code of silence that governs police practice and from the ways in which the system of mass incarceration is structured to reward dishonesty. But it’s also because police officers are human.

Research shows that ordinary human beings lie a lot — multiple times a day — even when there’s no clear benefit to lying. Generally, humans lie about relatively minor things like “I lost your phone number; that’s why I didn’t call” or “No, really, you don’t look fat.” But humans can also be persuaded to lie about far more important matters, especially if the lie will enhance or protect their reputation or standing in a group.

The natural tendency to lie makes quota systems and financial incentives that reward the police for the sheer numbers of people stopped, frisked or arrested especially dangerous. One lie can destroy a life, resulting in the loss of employment, a prison term and relegation to permanent second-class status. The fact that our legal system has become so tolerant of police lying indicates how corrupted our criminal justice system has become by declarations of war, “get tough” mantras, and a seemingly insatiable appetite for locking up and locking out the poorest and darkest among us.

And, no, I’m not crazy for thinking so.


Michelle Alexander is the author of “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.”
 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/03/opinion/sunday/why-police-officers-lie-under-oath.html?_r=0&pagewanted=print

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« Reply #994 on: February 05, 2013, 07:23:14 AM »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/04/doj-drones-paper_n_2619582.html


LOL - but but but but - nobel peace prize!!!!
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« Reply #995 on: February 06, 2013, 07:52:20 AM »

http://www.businessinsider.com/obamas-leaked-drone-memo-2013-2?op=1


Where are all the anti-war liberals now? 

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« Reply #996 on: February 06, 2013, 07:56:29 AM »

Ask yourself this question: If the US government is benign, why does it need to have the Patriot Act, secret rendition sites in 54 or more countries around the world; NDAA, SIPA, SOPA, FEMA camps; TSA VIPR teams on our highways and at our bus and train stations (more security theater); 7000 MORE M-4's for DHS (the REAL military kind, you know the full-auto kind that are the REAL "assault weapons" as opposed to the civilian semi-auto kind which the government is trying to ban); DHS purchasing 1.6 BILLION rounds of hollow point ammunition (ammunition that is not allowed on the battlefield per the Rules of Land Warfare so who are they going to use it against); to give heavily armored vehicles to local law enforcement around the country; to have security camera's and drones everywhere all tied together in fusion centers; a massive data center that has it's own power generating facility capable of capturing and storing all of the electronic (phone, internet, radio you name it) communications occuring every second on the entire planet for the next hundred years; to feel up travelers private parts (especially old people and children) in a effort to make everyone "feel safe"; to authorize in Obama Care (HR3590.AS, Section 5210 Establishing a Ready Reserve Corps) the formation of a federal civilian armed force of equal number, equipment and training to the U.S. Military; to hold "predeployment cross training and qualification" drills involving military and civilian paramilitary forces in heavily populated urban areas using military armored vehicles and helicopters firing their weapons indiscriminately (using blank ammunition); DHS's "See Something Say Something" program to turn our nation into a gaggle of government informants reminiscent of East Germany during the Cold War; to discredit right wing religious groups, prolife groups, pro Second Amendment groups and veterans returning from combat deployment as "future threats to America"?

Tell me AGAIN why DHS needs 7000 full auto M4's and 1.6 BILLION rounds of ammunition?

Instead of worrying about a law abiding citizen's semiautomatic AR15 that he uses to shoot cardboard targets a couple times a summer, why aren’t We The People wet-our-pants terrified of the sociopaths in DHS that are ordering banned for civilians full auto M4's with enough ammo to shoot every man woman and child in this country FIVE TIMES?

Ya, let's ban scary looking semi-automatic rifles. What a bunch of nitwits we are.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/obamas-leaked-drone-memo-2013-2?op=1#ixzz2K8BnVePB
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« Reply #997 on: February 06, 2013, 08:12:53 PM »

Government prosecutors argued against granting bond to Deming, N.M., gun dealer Rick Reese and his son Ryin, painting them as dangerous risks for release, court documents received this evening by Gun Rights Examiner reveal. United States Attorney Kenneth J. Gonzales, nominated by President Obama last November to serve on the U.S. District Court in the District of New Mexico, filed a supplement to the defendant’s motion for release in that court last Tuesday, citing an affidavit he claimed contained “statements relevant to the motion.
 
“[T]hey highlight the Defendants release still pose a danger to the community,” Gonzales wrote in the electronically filed document. “The statement also show the Defendants are not likely to follow any Court imposed orders or conditions.”
 
Gonzales was referring to a January 29 sworn and notarized statement by Homeland Security Investigations Special Agent Jose Ramon Martinez, in which the agent related monitored telephone conversations between the elder Reese and wife Terri, and also between son Ryin and his girlfriend.
 
Supposedly incriminating statements included Reese telling his wife “The truth will come out and these people will be exposed for what they truly are – a bunch of cons liars and cheats and thieves.
 
“They took a premise, they wanted our stuff, and they wanted to destroy out family so they reverse engineered,” the affidavit continued, quoting Reese.
 
“In reference to AUSA Maria Armijjo, Terri Reese stated ‘she is willing to get in bed with the devil to destroy a good Christian family,” the affidavit again alleged.
 
In a second intercepted call, the affidavit states Reese told his wife “He did say that they are attempting to hide and seal a whole bunch of stuff that they are trying to open you know, and that’s really encouraging because it shows the depth of the depravity of the justice department, it shows that they are just lying cheating stealing, it shows they are whores.”
 
“Rick Reese also stated to his wife, ‘You got ‘em by the [redacted]!” the affidavit further quotes.
 
In a third monitored telephone call, this one between son Ryin Reese and his unidentified girlfriend, the younger Reese is quoted telling her “The judge made it clear that he didn’t give a [redacted] about XXXX.”
 
Referring to the U.S. Marshal’s Service, the girlfriend remarked “They enjoy their power,” eliciting a response from Ryin that “[T]hey are the same people that back shoot 14-year-old boys and get medals, Ruby Ridge style.
 
In a subsequent call to Terri, Martinez wrote “Rick made comments to the effect of the following: ‘The marshals were both AH’s not at all like the marshals that we had during the trial … these two were full of testosterone. The more people like us that they hunt down and whack and murder, maybe not physically like Randy Weaver [or] the Branch Davidians, but they murdered my marriage.’”
 
So far, the conversations recorded and reported mirror sentiments shared by millions of peaceable Americans outraged by government operations in which citizens were killed when alternative peaceful outcomes were available. The clincher, at least as far as Gonzales is concerned, is in a final recorded conversation between Rick and Terri in which he reportedly stated “They’ll get the world they deserve pretty soon!”
 
Note there was no hint of this sentiment referring to anything illegal or violent, and again, such sentiments can be found on gun blogs and forums exposiing government corruption and excesses and calling for justice catching up to those who perpetrate injustice under color of authority. Indeed, that Judge Robert C. Brack ruled against Gonzales, who wanted to keep the new trial motion hearing selaed from the public, and then ruled against the prosecution’s fight to deny the Reese family both a new trial and bail, citing their suppression of evidence, point to the slow recognition that the defendants have been the victims.
 
This transparent attempt to portray the defendants as dangers to the community and as being too risky to grant bail, especially after almost 18 months behind bars with all major charges either dismissed or having been found not guilty of, and the further attempt to do so closed off from public scrutiny should raise serious doubts on the fitness of Gonzales to be elevated to a judgeship and more. A correspondence by a California attorney to N.M. Senator Martin Heinrich requesting an investigation for misconduct, to include the potential for disbarment and criminal prosecution, may point the way to similar efforts from both supporters of the Reese family and those simply interested in basic justice. American citizens are presumed innocent until proven guilty, and are not to be destroyed in the process of trying to defend themselves, with all their assets seized, against ambitious government careerists wielding essentially unlimited power and resources.

http://www.examiner.com/article/government-fought-bail-release-claiming-gun-dealers-a-danger-to-community

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« Reply #998 on: February 06, 2013, 08:17:01 PM »

Government prosecutors argued against granting bond to Deming, N.M., gun dealer Rick Reese and his son Ryin, painting them as dangerous risks for release, court documents received this evening by Gun Rights Examiner reveal. United States Attorney Kenneth J. Gonzales, nominated by President Obama last November to serve on the U.S. District Court in the District of New Mexico, filed a supplement to the defendant’s motion for release in that court last Tuesday, citing an affidavit he claimed contained “statements relevant to the motion.
 
“[T]hey highlight the Defendants release still pose a danger to the community,” Gonzales wrote in the electronically filed document. “The statement also show the Defendants are not likely to follow any Court imposed orders or conditions.”
 
Gonzales was referring to a January 29 sworn and notarized statement by Homeland Security Investigations Special Agent Jose Ramon Martinez, in which the agent related monitored telephone conversations between the elder Reese and wife Terri, and also between son Ryin and his girlfriend.
 
Supposedly incriminating statements included Reese telling his wife “The truth will come out and these people will be exposed for what they truly are – a bunch of cons liars and cheats and thieves.
 
“They took a premise, they wanted our stuff, and they wanted to destroy out family so they reverse engineered,” the affidavit continued, quoting Reese.
 
“In reference to AUSA Maria Armijjo, Terri Reese stated ‘she is willing to get in bed with the devil to destroy a good Christian family,” the affidavit again alleged.
 
In a second intercepted call, the affidavit states Reese told his wife “He did say that they are attempting to hide and seal a whole bunch of stuff that they are trying to open you know, and that’s really encouraging because it shows the depth of the depravity of the justice department, it shows that they are just lying cheating stealing, it shows they are whores.”
 
“Rick Reese also stated to his wife, ‘You got ‘em by the [redacted]!” the affidavit further quotes.
 
In a third monitored telephone call, this one between son Ryin Reese and his unidentified girlfriend, the younger Reese is quoted telling her “The judge made it clear that he didn’t give a [redacted] about XXXX.”
 
Referring to the U.S. Marshal’s Service, the girlfriend remarked “They enjoy their power,” eliciting a response from Ryin that “[T]hey are the same people that back shoot 14-year-old boys and get medals, Ruby Ridge style.
 
In a subsequent call to Terri, Martinez wrote “Rick made comments to the effect of the following: ‘The marshals were both AH’s not at all like the marshals that we had during the trial … these two were full of testosterone. The more people like us that they hunt down and whack and murder, maybe not physically like Randy Weaver [or] the Branch Davidians, but they murdered my marriage.’”
 
So far, the conversations recorded and reported mirror sentiments shared by millions of peaceable Americans outraged by government operations in which citizens were killed when alternative peaceful outcomes were available. The clincher, at least as far as Gonzales is concerned, is in a final recorded conversation between Rick and Terri in which he reportedly stated “They’ll get the world they deserve pretty soon!”
 
Note there was no hint of this sentiment referring to anything illegal or violent, and again, such sentiments can be found on gun blogs and forums exposiing government corruption and excesses and calling for justice catching up to those who perpetrate injustice under color of authority. Indeed, that Judge Robert C. Brack ruled against Gonzales, who wanted to keep the new trial motion hearing selaed from the public, and then ruled against the prosecution’s fight to deny the Reese family both a new trial and bail, citing their suppression of evidence, point to the slow recognition that the defendants have been the victims.
 
This transparent attempt to portray the defendants as dangers to the community and as being too risky to grant bail, especially after almost 18 months behind bars with all major charges either dismissed or having been found not guilty of, and the further attempt to do so closed off from public scrutiny should raise serious doubts on the fitness of Gonzales to be elevated to a judgeship and more. A correspondence by a California attorney to N.M. Senator Martin Heinrich requesting an investigation for misconduct, to include the potential for disbarment and criminal prosecution, may point the way to similar efforts from both supporters of the Reese family and those simply interested in basic justice. American citizens are presumed innocent until proven guilty, and are not to be destroyed in the process of trying to defend themselves, with all their assets seized, against ambitious government careerists wielding essentially unlimited power and resources.

http://www.examiner.com/article/government-fought-bail-release-claiming-gun-dealers-a-danger-to-community


What did they do wrong? What were they arrested for?
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« Reply #999 on: February 06, 2013, 08:17:08 PM »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/06/obama-drone-program-targeted-killing_n_2631425.html


LMFAO!!!!!

Now they are upset?
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