Author Topic: Police State - Official Thread  (Read 678146 times)

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4925 on: June 16, 2020, 02:13:34 PM »
Massive corporate databases become government tools of surveillance

The number of data requests the US government sent to Google has increased 510% since 2010. US government requests to Facebook have also increased 364% since the beginning of 2013. The databases of private companies are increasingly being used to monitor individuals with little transparency into the process.

In 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed the National Security Agency was conducting dragnet, mass surveillance, he forced the public to refocus on how to protect the right to privacy. These revelations inspired the founders of ProtonMail to begin thinking about how people could privately communicate with each other.

Two years later, the US Congress passed the Freedom Act, which stopped the NSA’s bulk collection of private data. Data collection can only be performed against individual suspects with the approval of the secretive FISA court. However, the bulk collection of private data still happens; only now it is carried out by private corporations like Google, Facebook, and Internet service providers. 

While US law prevents the NSA from performing bulk data collection, corporations like Google and Facebook face few restrictions on gathering data on their users. So, to get the data it wants, the NSA simply goes to these companies with user data requests. Under the Freedom Act, if the US government can convince a judge in the FISA court that an investigation pertains to national security, then they can request that a company share whatever data it has on an individual. And requests that are delivered via a national security letter do not need a judge’s approval, not even from the FISA court. This secretive system gives the government access to the reams of personal information these companies collect with little transparency or public oversight.

Companies can refuse or argue that the request should be more narrowly interpreted, but then they face costly legal action. Google began charging governments a fee for processing such  data requests, a move that some claim will help winnow out frivolous or unnecessary requests. That being said, the majority of user data requests are respected. Facebook has shared information in response to a user data request roughly 74% of the time, and that percentage has remained steady since 2017.

This success rate has led more and more governments to use online platforms as their data collection services. Between the first half of 2013 and the end of 2019, the number of data requests made by governments worldwide to Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Yahoo has increased by roughly 320%.

Unsurprisingly, given the weak privacy protections offered by the FISA courts, the United States sent the most data requests to private companies in 2019. In fact, the US made more data requests (168,000) to Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Yahoo than the rest of the countries that make up the 14 Eyes intelligence-sharing agreement combined. (These statistics do not include the user data requests sent to Twitter and Yahoo for the second half of 2019, as they have not yet shared this data.)

https://protonmail.com/blog/privacy-user-data-requests/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4926 on: June 17, 2020, 12:51:11 PM »
This man spent 5 months in jail and was facing 20 years in prison. As usual the cops investigated themselves and cleared themselves of any wrongdoing. But why was the body cam footage ignored for 5 months? And why are the cops not in prison? (rhetorical questions)

Man with mental illness spent nearly 5 months in jail before body cam video revealed Garfield Heights officers beat, tased and mocked him

A group of Garfield Heights police officers punched, kicked and repeatedly shocked a man diagnosed with bipolar and schizophrenia disorders with a stun gun, according to body camera videos obtained by cleveland.com.

The videos show the officers hurl curse words at 28-year-old Kenta Settles as he lay handcuffed on the ground.

Officer Michael Malak stopped Settles Jan. 23 as he walked on the sidewalk on Turney Road in the city’s main business corridor. Malak immediately detained Settles without telling him why, and, in a matter of seconds, Malak and another officer, Robert Pitts, tackled Settles to the ground and shot Taser prongs into his back as he lay in the fetal position, the videos show.

The ensuing scuffle left Malak with a broken nose and Settles with a chipped tooth, a rotator cuff injury and a slice near his eye, according to police and court records.

Settles was indicted by a grand jury 7 days after his arrest on charges of felonious assault of a peace officer and obstructing official business. He was jailed on a $250,000 bond. Garfield Heights police were cleared two weeks after his indictment by an internal investigation that lay all of the blame for the altercation on Settles.

He remained in jail for nearly 5 months, facing more than two decades in prison, as his case inched through the court system. Then the disclosure of the police officers’ body camera videos, which had been a public record for more than five months, sparked a flurry of developments in the last week.

A judge on June 8 granted Settles a personal bond and released him from the county jail. Settles on Thursday filed a lawsuit in federal court in Cleveland accusing Malak, Pitts and three other Garfield Heights officers who aided his arrest of using excessive force against him and violating his constitutional rights.

Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Michael O’Malley’s office on Friday dismissed the criminal charges against Settles, two days after the county prosecutor whose office indicted Settles in January viewed the body camera video for the first time.

O’Malley’s office will go back to the grand jury and re-present “the entire case” for any additional charges, a spokesman said on Friday. The spokesman refused to answer any other questions about the case, including whether O’Malley’s office is considering seeking charges against the officers.

https://www.cleveland.com/court-justice/2020/06/mentally-ill-man-spent-nearly-5-months-in-jail-before-body-cam-video-revealed-garfield-heights-officers-beat-tased-and-mocked-him.html

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4927 on: June 21, 2020, 01:44:02 PM »
Domestic terrorism with "qualified immunity".

Supreme Court: No Consequences for Police Who Destroy Home, Mistakenly Shoot 10-Year-Old Boy, or Sic Police Dog on Suspect Already Under Arrest

Despite growing calls to hold police accountable for using excessive force in non-threatening circumstances, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to review any cases challenging the doctrine of “qualified immunity,” which shields police from liability for official wrongdoing. The nine qualified immunity cases in which the Court denied cert involved a SWAT team’s destruction of a home by bombarding it with tear gas grenades, a police dog that was ordered to attack a man who had already surrendered, and the mistaken shooting of a 10-year-old boy by a cop who was aiming for a non-threatening family dog. The Rutherford Institute and a coalition that included the DKT Liberty Project, the Due Process Institute, and Reason Foundation had asked the Court to reign in police abuses by holding police accountable to the rule of law.

Attorneys Jessica Ring Amunson and Andrew C. Noll of Jenner & Block LLP in Washington, D.C., assisted The Rutherford Institute with its amicus brief in West.

“This refusal by the Supreme Court to hold police accountable for official misconduct is a chilling reminder that in the American police state, ‘we the people’ are at the mercy of law enforcement officers who have almost absolute discretion to decide who is a threat, what constitutes resistance, and how harshly they can deal with the citizens they were appointed to ‘serve and protect,” said constitutional attorney John W. Whitehead, president of The Rutherford Institute and author of Battlefield America: The War on the American People. “In the police state being erected around us, the police and other government agents can probe, poke, pinch, taser, search, seize, strip and generally manhandle anyone they see fit in almost any circumstance, all with the general blessing of the courts, no matter how egregious or in opposition to the Constitution.”

https://www.rutherford.org/publications_resources/on_the_front_lines/supreme_court_no_consequences_for_police_who_destroy_home_mistakenly_shoot_10_year_old_boy_or_sic_police_dog_on_suspect_already_under_arrest


Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4928 on: June 22, 2020, 02:41:05 PM »
The sensitive pussies overracted? How surprising... Notice also the role of the criminal unions on the issue.

How conspiracy theories about the NYPD Shake Shack ‘poisoning’ blew up

The three cops at the center of the NYPD milkshake “poisoning” scandal never even got sick, and there wasn’t the slightest whiff of criminality from the get-go — but that didn’t stop gung-ho brass from rolling out the crime scene tape and unions from dishing out empty conspiracy theories, The Post has learned.

The fullest picture yet to emerge of the incident — which came amid fraught tensions between the police and public — is based on records and multiple interviews with police sources.

The three officers were down from The Bronx, on protest duty in Lower Manhattan, on June 15 when they ordered the now-infamous mid-shift treats via a mobile app around 7:30 p.m., purchasing three shakes across two separate orders, sources said.

Their drinks were waiting for them when they arrived at the Shake Shack on the second floor of 200 Broadway a few minutes later. A female officer picked up her strawberry shake from the front counter, and her two male colleagues grabbed their cherry and vanilla drinks from a side counter, sources said.

Police sources explained it was clear that the workers couldn’t have known cops had placed the orders “since it wasn’t done in person” — and they couldn’t have dosed the drinks after the officers arrived, because they were packaged and waiting for pickup when the trio walked in.

Soon after sipping the shakes, however, the cops realized they didn’t taste or smell right, so they threw the drinks in the trash and alerted a manager, who apologized and issued them vouchers for free food or drink, which they accepted, according to sources.

But when the cops told their sergeant about the incident, the supervisor called in the Emergency Service Unit to set up a crime scene at the fast-food joint for an evidence search around 9:20 p.m. — nearly two hours after they first got the sour shakes.

The three were rushed to Bellevue Hospital, where they were examined and released without ever showing symptoms, sources said.


Meanwhile, a lieutenant from the Bronx blasted out an email to the unions that six cops “started throwing up after drinking beverages they got from shake shack on 200 Broadway.”

It was unclear why the sergeant and lieutenant escalated the situation.

Detectives easily closed the case after interviewing five employees and reviewing surveillance footage showing the shakes were made normally, sources said.

The machine was cleaned before the officers ordered, according to sources, and it still contained residual milkstone remover — a typically acidic solution used to combat buildup in dairy equipment.

But by 10:45 p.m., the Detectives Endowment Association was declaring that Finest had become “ill” after being “intentionally poisoned by one or more workers at the Shake Shack” — as Police Benevolent Association president Pat Lynch made a show of visiting Bellevue while his union declared at 10:47 p.m. that police officers came “under attack” from a “toxic substance, believed to be bleach.”


Both messages flurried across social media, spawning a trending #BoycottShakeShack hashtag that was still being tweeted Sunday by users who appear to erroneously believe NYPD members were intentionally poisoned.

Around 3 a.m. June 16, the department was reviewing a statement on the matter, and at 4 a.m. — just over eight hours after the cops picked up their shakes — Chief of Detectives Rodney Harrison announced on Twitter that there was “no criminality.”

The unions later deleted their tweets and issued statements walking back their discredited claims. Privately, they blamed the lieutenant who first raised the false alarm.

https://nypost.com/2020/06/22/how-nypd-faked-shake-shack-controversy-and-conspiracy-theory/


Also, notice the logo of one of the criminal unions. Are they try to fool or intimidate people into thinking they're the DEA with this made up badge?



Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4929 on: June 23, 2020, 09:16:39 PM »
The firing took a while but the chief of police is trying to cover his ass and his department. Of course the cops who participated in this execution, have not been arrested or charged.

"He wantonly and blindly fired ten (10) rounds".

Not only was Breonna Taylor executed in her own apartment while she was sleeping, but three of the rounds Hankison fired entered the apartment next to Taylor's. These are the "brave heroes" who are given a badge that they think gives them unlimited "authoritay", are supposedly "trained" to use firearms and whose supposed job is to "enforce laws".

Louisville Police Department fires officer involved in Breonna Taylor's death

The Louisville Metro Police Department announced Tuesday that it has fired Brett Hankison, one of the officers involved in the March shooting death of 26-year-old emergency medical worker Breonna Taylor. In a letter to Hankison tweeted by the department, the Louisville police chief called his conduct "a shock to the conscience."

Taylor was killed on March 13, when officers entered her home looking for illegal drugs. Officials claimed the officers knocked on the door and announced themselves, and only started shooting after they were "immediately met by gunfire" from Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker. But Taylor's family said in a lawsuit that the officers did not identify themselves, and that Walker — a licensed gun owner — thought someone was trying to break in.

The letter states that Hankison was found to have violated two standard operating procedures: obedience to rules and regulations and use of deadly force.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/breonna-taylor-shooting-officer-brett-hankison-involved-fired/




Soul Crusher

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4930 on: June 24, 2020, 05:50:56 AM »
I'd trust the military more than most local PD's.  Military members do constant training.   Most of these people don't do squat training wise. 

The firing took a while but the chief of police is trying to cover his ass and his department. Of course the cops who participated in this execution, have not been arrested or charged.

"He wantonly and blindly fired ten (10) rounds".

Not only was Breonna Taylor executed in her own apartment while she was sleeping, but three of the rounds Hankison fired entered the apartment next to Taylor's. These are the "brave heroes" who are given a badge that they think gives them unlimited "authoritay", are supposedly "trained" to use firearms and whose supposed job is to "enforce laws".

Louisville Police Department fires officer involved in Breonna Taylor's death

The Louisville Metro Police Department announced Tuesday that it has fired Brett Hankison, one of the officers involved in the March shooting death of 26-year-old emergency medical worker Breonna Taylor. In a letter to Hankison tweeted by the department, the Louisville police chief called his conduct "a shock to the conscience."

Taylor was killed on March 13, when officers entered her home looking for illegal drugs. Officials claimed the officers knocked on the door and announced themselves, and only started shooting after they were "immediately met by gunfire" from Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker. But Taylor's family said in a lawsuit that the officers did not identify themselves, and that Walker — a licensed gun owner — thought someone was trying to break in.

The letter states that Hankison was found to have violated two standard operating procedures: obedience to rules and regulations and use of deadly force.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/breonna-taylor-shooting-officer-brett-hankison-involved-fired/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4931 on: June 24, 2020, 12:43:50 PM »
Perverted freak. Of course he is enjoying paid vacation.

Trooper charged with stalking after taking woman's phone, sending himself nude photos

A Minnesota State Patrol trooper was charged with felony stalking for taking a woman’s cell phone and using it to send himself nude photos of her, the Hennepin County Attorney's Office announced Tuesday.

Albert Kuehne, 36, was charged with two counts of stalking with bias due to the fact the victim was a woman.

According to the criminal complaint, on March 25, Kuehne worked a single-car accident at Interstate 94 and Cedar Avenue in Minneapolis. The driver, a 25-year-old woman, was detained by Kuehne as a possible drunk driver. She was taken to a hospital where she was treated and released.

When the woman returned home, her boyfriend was using her laptop, which is linked to her cell phone. According to the complaint, the laptop records showed the woman’s phone was accessed and nude photos of her were texted from it to an unknown phone.

Her boyfriend called the phone number, and the person who answered eventually identified himself as Kuehne. The woman called a lawyer, who reported the incident. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension began an investigation.

According to the complaint, Kuehne’s squad video showed him leading the woman to his squad car. Along the way, the woman took out her phone, and Kuehne demanded that she give it to him. The cell phone records indicate the photos were sent from the woman’s phone at 4:44 p.m. The video showed Kuehne alone in his squad at that time while paramedics treated the woman.

Investigators obtained a search warrant and seized Kuehne's phone. They found three photos of the woman on his phone, according to the complaint.

According the the Minnesota State Patrol, Kuehne was placed on paid investigatory leave May 20, 2020.

https://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/trooper-charged-with-stalking-after-taking-womans-phone-sending-himself-nude-photos

illuminati

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4932 on: June 24, 2020, 01:43:21 PM »
Perverted freak. Of course he is enjoying paid vacation.

Trooper charged with stalking after taking woman's phone, sending himself nude photos

A Minnesota State Patrol trooper was charged with felony stalking for taking a woman’s cell phone and using it to send himself nude photos of her, the Hennepin County Attorney's Office announced Tuesday.

Albert Kuehne, 36, was charged with two counts of stalking with bias due to the fact the victim was a woman.

According to the criminal complaint, on March 25, Kuehne worked a single-car accident at Interstate 94 and Cedar Avenue in Minneapolis. The driver, a 25-year-old woman, was detained by Kuehne as a possible drunk driver. She was taken to a hospital where she was treated and released.

When the woman returned home, her boyfriend was using her laptop, which is linked to her cell phone. According to the complaint, the laptop records showed the woman’s phone was accessed and nude photos of her were texted from it to an unknown phone.

Her boyfriend called the phone number, and the person who answered eventually identified himself as Kuehne. The woman called a lawyer, who reported the incident. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension began an investigation.

According to the complaint, Kuehne’s squad video showed him leading the woman to his squad car. Along the way, the woman took out her phone, and Kuehne demanded that she give it to him. The cell phone records indicate the photos were sent from the woman’s phone at 4:44 p.m. The video showed Kuehne alone in his squad at that time while paramedics treated the woman.

Investigators obtained a search warrant and seized Kuehne's phone. They found three photos of the woman on his phone, according to the complaint.

According the the Minnesota State Patrol, Kuehne was placed on paid investigatory leave May 20, 2020.

https://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/trooper-charged-with-stalking-after-taking-womans-phone-sending-himself-nude-photos


No doubt his bosses will tell him off for being so amateur & careless Then Give Him a Promotion.

Nude Pics Matter.

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4933 on: June 24, 2020, 04:33:52 PM »
Police Union Contract Arbitration Requirements Keep Bad Cops On The Job

By Martha Bellisle, AP

An Oregon police officer lost his job and then returned to work after fatally shooting an unarmed Black man in the back. A Florida sergeant was let go six times for using excessive force and stealing from suspects, while a Texas lieutenant was terminated five times after being accused of striking two women, making threatening calls and committing other infractions.

These officers and hundreds of others across the country were fired, sometimes repeatedly, for violating policies but got their jobs back after appealing their cases to an arbitrator who overturned their discipline — an all-too-common practice that some experts in law and in policing say stands in the way of real accountability.

“Arbitration inherently undermines police decisions,” said Michael Gennaco, a police reform expert and former federal civil rights prosecutor who specialized in police misconduct cases. “It’s dismaying to see arbitrators regularly putting people back to work.”

The killing of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer sparked weeks of protests and calls for reforms, but experts say arbitration can block those efforts.

Arbitration, the appeals process used by most law enforcement agencies, contributes to officer misconduct, limits public oversight and dampens morale, said Stephen Rushin, a Loyola University Chicago law professor who last year published a study on arbitration in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review.

“Police arbitration on appeal is one of the single most important accountability issues in the country,” he told The Associated Press. “You can’t change an organization if you have to keep employing people that you know are going to do bad things.”

Generally, when a misconduct complaint is filed against an officer, it’s investigated internally and if a policy violation occurred, the chief or other official may order discipline ranging from oral reprimand to suspension to termination.

An officer who objects can appeal to an arbitrator. Each state and municipality is different, but this is the most common process. Police unions argue that arbitration is less expensive and less time-consuming than going to court, so it’s written into their contracts.

Arbitrators are usually lawyers who focus on labor law, and in most cases they have the final word. The process can take years. Officers who are fired and reinstated can get back pay for the time they weren’t working.

The contract between the Seattle police union and the city states the burden of proof to fire an officer must be “more than preponderance of the evidence,” in cases for an offense that could “stigmatize” an officer and make it harder to get employment elsewhere.

This type of requirement is common, Gennaco said, adding, “The raised standard for termination cases is another example of a union contract that gives special rights to police.”

James Pasco, executive director of the National Fraternal Order of Police, which has 351,000 members, said management should do a better job when hiring officers.

“Rather than acknowledge their failure in recruiting and screening, they want to blame problem officers on the union contract,” Pasco said Monday. “If they did appropriate recruiting, training and supervision, we wouldn’t be in the position of using arbitration.”

It’s unclear whether some cases are overturned due to an arbitrator’s personal bias or flaws in the internal investigations, or both, said Rushin, the law professor.

One Seattle officer was fired for punching a handcuffed woman in his patrol car in 2014. He appealed, and the arbitrator reduced his punishment to a 15-day suspension. The city appealed in state court, and the judge reinstated his dismissal.

That’s unusual, Rushin said. More often, union agreements make the arbitrator’s decision final, and a court can’t overturn it.

Officials in Portland, Oregon, took their opposition to an arbitrator’s decision to the Oregon Court of Appeals but lost their bid to enforce the firing of Officer Ron Frashour.

Frashour and another officer had gone to the home of Aaron Campbell on Jan. 29, 2010, on a report that he was distraught over his brother’s death. The officers ordered Campbell to exit the home, and he came out unarmed, walking backward with his hands on his head. Frashour shot Campbell in his back, killing him.

Portland settled a federal lawsuit with the Campbell estate in 2012 for $1.2 million, and city officials fired Frashour, concluding Campbell didn’t pose a threat. But an arbitrator ruled in 2012 that the city must reinstate him. The city appealed and lost again.


San Antonio officials have repeatedly ordered discipline for Lt. Lee Rakun, but he successfully appealed his termination five times, according to reports. His most recent suspension occurred in 2018 for leaving work early and defying authority. He appealed that firing once again.

Rakun isn’t alone. San Antonio TV station KSAT found that two-thirds of fired officers had gotten their jobs back since 2010.

San Antonio City Manager Erik Walsh said the current collective bargaining agreement limits the chief’s ability to appropriately discipline officers.

“We intend to bring those issues to the next contract negotiation with the police union,” he said. “I am hoping the police union will agree that these cases tarnish and impact the community’s confidence in our police department.”

A Florida police officer who was fired six times went back on patrol in 2018. An arbitrator ordered the Opa-locka Police Department to rehire Sgt. German Bosque after he was fired in 2013 for evidence tampering. A 2011 Sarasota Herald-Tribune report said Bosque had 40 internal affairs complaints, including 16 for battery or excessive force.

When an arbitrator changes the punishment or throws it out, it can have a demoralizing effect on the people in charge.

“One of the most common complaints I’ve heard from chiefs is they say why should an unelected arbitrator, who doesn’t know our department, doesn’t know our history, why should they be the one that gets to decide which type of punishment is excessive and which type of punishment is reasonable?” Rushin said.

No state or federal agency tracks arbitration outcomes, but media investigations have documented hundreds of officers who returned to work after being fired. A Washington Post report documented 1,881 officers who were fired between 2006 and 2016, and 451 got their jobs back through arbitration.

https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/police-union-contract-arbitration-requirements-keep-bad-cops-on-the-job/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4934 on: June 25, 2020, 10:49:16 AM »
In the midst of the Covid-19 crisis, the cops kill an EMT while she is sleeping in her home.

Conveniently, the killers did not wear body cameras. Of course none of them has been arrested.


Family of Louisville EMT killed during LMPD raid files wrongful death lawsuit against officers



The family of a Louisville EMT killed in what's been alleged to have been a botched Louisville Metro Police raid has filed a lawsuit against the officers involved, claiming she did "nothing to deserve to die at their hands."

Attorneys say police had the wrong home and that the suspect they were looking for was already in custody before the raid. Nothing illegal was found in Taylor's home.

The officers burst into the home without knocking and "blindly fired" into it, spraying bullets into Taylor's house and neighboring apartments "with a total disregard for the value of human life," according to the lawsuit. Taylor, 26, was shot eight times.

Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, thought they were being robbed, according to his attorney, and fired at officers when they rushed in, hitting LMPD Sgt. John Mattingly in the leg.

Breonna Taylor was shot multiple times after officers used a battering ram to get into her home on Springfield Drive in south Louisville about 1 a.m. on March 13 in order to serve a warrant.

Police say there is no body camera footage from the raid as officers in LMPD criminal interdiction division do not wear body cameras.

https://www.wdrb.com/news/family-of-louisville-emt-killed-during-lmpd-raid-files-wrongful-death-lawsuit-against-officers/article_8caf7c9c-93b7-11ea-8253-5fbf4d80f0e7.html

Lying cops, none of whom wore body cameras quite conveniently, nearly blank police reports and now rubber stamping judges approving ridiculous warrants. And all this despite the fact that the man the cops were looking for had already been arrested. Now an innocent woman, an EMT who served her community unlike these domestic terrorists, was executed in cold blood.

The judge who approved the warrant in Breonna Taylor's case signed 5 warrants in 12 minutes!

Louisville detective who obtained no-knock search warrant for Breonna Taylor reassigned

Detective Jaynes wrote five affidavits seeking a judge's permission for no-knock searches, including at Taylor's South End apartment, as a part of a narcotics investigation in March.

Jefferson Circuit Judge Mary Shaw signed all five within 12 minutes.

The language on all five warrants is similar, describing the criminal history of the suspects and Jaynes' observations. All end by asking for a no-knock entry "due to the nature of how these drug traffickers operate."

Jaynes wrote that the subjects have a history of attempting to destroy evidence, use cameras to monitor police and have a history of fleeing law enforcement.

https://www.courier-journal.com/story/news/local/2020/06/10/breonna-taylor-louisville-detective-joshua-jaynes-no-knock-warrant-reassigned/5333604002/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4935 on: June 25, 2020, 07:20:48 PM »
Sheriff asks attorney general to monitor shooting while stonewalling inspector general

The independent monitors for the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department were brought in for moments like these.

The law enforcement agency is facing outrage from the community and questions about back-to-back shootings that left two men dead as well as its handling of the death of Robert Fuller, 24, who was found hanging from a tree near Palmdale City Hall.

But the two institutions tasked with overseeing investigations of deputies’ use of force — the Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission and its investigative arm, the Office of Inspector General — say they are running into roadblocks.

Inspector General Max Huntsman said his office on Monday asked the Sheriff’s Department for reports, documents and video relating to the shooting death of 18-year-old Andres Guardado, who was killed by a deputy near an auto body shop in Gardena. Huntsman said he hasn’t received a response.

The office also requested the report that detailed events surrounding the death of Fuller’s half-brother, Terron Boone, who was killed in a shootout with undercover detectives, to “analyze the underlying reason for the manner in which the arrest was conducted,” Huntsman said. “But they refused to give it to us.”

The watchdogs’ functions were centerpieces of reforms enacted at the Sheriff’s Department in the wake of a corruption and brutality scandal in the jails that led to indictments of several sheriff’s deputies and high-ranking commanders, including former Sheriff Lee Baca. But the agencies have increasingly complained that the administration of Sheriff Alex Villanueva is refusing to share information and stonewalling efforts to provide true oversight.

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-06-25/sheriff-villanueva-attorney-general-shootings

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4936 on: June 25, 2020, 10:00:09 PM »
"If they have nothing to hide, what are they afraid of?"

California Agency Blocks Release of Police Use of Force and Surveillance Training, Claiming Copyright

Under a California law that went into effect on January 1, 2020, all law enforcement training materials must be “conspicuously” published on the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) website.

However, if you visit POST’s Open Data hub and try to download the officer training materials relating to face recognition technology or automated license plate readers (ALPRs), or the California Peace Officers Association’s course on use of force, you will receive only a Word document with a single sentence:



This is unlawful, and unacceptable, EFF told POST in a letter submitted today. Under the new California law, SB 978, POST must post law enforcement training materials online if the materials would be available to the public under the California Public Records Act. Copyrighted material is available to the public under the California Public Records Act—in fact, EFF obtained a full, unredacted copy of POST’s ALPR training through a records request just last year.

The company that creates POST’s courses on ALPR and face recognition is the same company that sells the technology: Vigilant Solutions (now a subsidiary of Motorola Solutions). This company has a long history of including non-publication clauses in its contracts with law enforcement as a means to control its intellectual property. But, as we explain in our letter, SB 978 is clear: copyright law is not a valid excuse for POST to evade its transparency obligations.

And what’s just as bad is that even when copyright isn’t an issue, POST has only released training course outlines, and not the training materials themselves. Indeed, POST has made no training materials about the use of force available, sharing only the outlines. With police use of force currently a hotly debated issue throughout the state and nation, it is all the more concerning that POST is unlawfully hiding this material.

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2020/06/california-agency-blocks-release-police-use-force-and-surveillance-training

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4937 on: June 29, 2020, 11:25:24 AM »
Notice how many cops are involved in domestic abuse, child abuse and generally violent behavior not just "at work" but also at home?

Note that the police department he worked for was accused of covering up the abuse and was later disbanded.

Colorado Court of Appeals overturns conviction of former Berthoud police officer for sexually abusing daughter

The Colorado Court of Appeals has reversed the conviction of former Berthoud police officer Jeremy Yachik for sexually assaulting his daughter on the grounds that testimony of him physically abusing her was impermissibly entered into evidence.

In an opinion published Thursday, Judge Gilbert Román wrote that Yachik’s conviction was overturned and he would have to have a new trial.

Yachik, a former police officer for the now-disbanded Berthoud Police Department, was found guilty of two counts of sexual assault on a child by a jury in 2016, and sentenced to two consecutive 16-year terms in prison.

The charges stem from two incidents in 2010 and 2011 or 2012 when Yachik sexually assaulted and groped his daughter, who was respectively in eighth and ninth grade, according to evidence.

Yachik was also sentenced to three years of probation in 2014 after being convicted of a misdemeanor count of child abuse after his ex-girlfriend sent a video to law enforcement showing him hitting and kicking his daughter.

The case sparked an investigation into the Berthoud Police Department, which was accused of failing to investigate the case. The department was dissolved and the Larimer County Sheriff’s Office took over law enforcement duties in Berthoud.

During Yachik’s trial for sexual abuse, the video was included in evidence and his daughter testified that he had physically abused her almost daily during the time that she lived with him.

“At the prosecutors’ prompting, she detailed for the jury how the defendant would force her to eat hot sauce concoctions, zip tie her hands behind her back and lock her in a dark room for hours, kick her, beat her, choke her, spray her eyes with police department grade pepper spray, deprive her of food and force her to endure extreme exercise without rest,” the opinion said.

The prosecutor asked the jury to “think about what this girl went through, think about what she told you and described” and find Yachik guilty, the opinion said.

In the appeal, Yachik argued that the evidence was irrelevant and highly prejudicial, and encouraged the jury to convict him based on prior misconduct.

The prosecution argued that the testimony was important for helping the jury understand why Yachik’s daughter initially lied to protect him and why she delayed reporting the assaults, the opinion said.

In a legal analysis, Román concluded that the evidence was not permissible because there is no proof that the physical and sexual abuse were linked or that describing the physical abuse was necessary context for the sexual abuse case.

“Reading through the trial transcript, one might easily forget that the defendant was on trial for sexual assault and believe he was also on trial for charges of child abuse,” Román wrote in the opinion. “The prosecutor used this evidence to paint the defendant in a bad light and appeal to the jury’s emotions.”

Because it cannot be proven that the evidence did not influence the verdict, the court reversed Yachik’s conviction and remanded the case for a new trial in which the evidence should be excluded.

https://www.reporterherald.com/2020/06/26/colorado-court-of-appeals-overturns-conviction-of-former-berthoud-police-officer-for-sexually-abusing-daughter/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4938 on: June 29, 2020, 12:01:26 PM »
Damned if you do, damned if you don't.
Now cops attack and mangle people for refusing to talk.

Of course don't expect any riots about this incident and even in the slim chance the man is awarded damages the bill will sent to the taxpayers as the cops will not pay a cent from their pocket and won't see a day in prison.

Loveland man sues police, claiming unlawful excessive force, false arrest

A man is suing the Loveland Police Department after he says officers forcefully and wrongfully arrested him when he refused to answer questions as a witness about a motorcycle crash last fall.

Preston Sowl says he needed a shoulder replacement surgery after an officer twisted his arms behind his back and threw him on the pavement in the parking lot of a Loveland bar in September.

Sowl's arrest was captured on body camera footage. His attorney, Sarah Schielke, said he and his wife were leaving Charlie L's pub that afternoon when they saw a motorcyclist laying under a fallen motorcycle. The crash was blocking the parking lot exit. Sowl and other bystanders went to help the motorcyclist, and another bystander lifted the bike off the man, who was bleeding and visibly injured.

Body camera footage of Sowl's arrest shows Loveland police officer Paul Ashe attempting to question Sowl about the crash after Sowl tells him where the injured man's motorcycle was moved.

"I don't know what happened," Sowl said. "I'm not talking to nobody."

The encounter quickly escalated, with Ashe telling Sowl that he had to talk to him and threatening to arrest him for obstruction. Sowl repeatedly refused, which was within his constitutional rights, his lawyers argued in the lawsuit.

"It is long-established that a citizen cannot be charged with obstruction (or any crime) for merely refusing to answer police questioning," Schielke wrote.

Ashe and other officers then arrested Sowl, twisting his arms behind his back to cuff him after he wouldn't put his hands behind his back. The footage shows Sowl yelling and cursing in protest during a struggle, and the camera's view is obscured for about 20 seconds. When the visual footage returns, Sowl is face down on the ground with his hands cuffed behind his back. As officers lift him from the ground, he yells in pain and says his shoulder is "f----ed up."

Ashe cited Sowl for obstruction of a peace officer and resisting arrest, but the Larimer County District Attorney's Office dismissed the charges, according to the lawsuit. There is no record of the charges in public court documents.

According to Sowl's lawsuit, his shoulder was dislocated during the arrest, and he suffered bleeding cuts on his head, knees, legs, arms and wrist. He also retore the rotator cuff he'd recently had repaired through surgery. He later had his shoulder replaced, which Schielke said was a result of injuries from the arrest. The Coloradoan reviewed redacted medical records verifying his surgery.



https://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/2020/06/23/loveland-man-sues-police-claiming-excessive-force-false-arrest/3238531001/

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4939 on: June 30, 2020, 05:24:17 AM »
looks like someones ma was ass-raped by cops here, total meltdown

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4940 on: July 03, 2020, 05:13:17 AM »

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4941 on: July 04, 2020, 10:56:29 AM »
The young man who was killed was white so of course there was no rioting or looting. Had this young man been black it would have been a much different story.

But secretly spending taxpayer money to give to the cop who killed this young man is outrageous.

Overland Park paid former police officer who fatally shot teen to resign

A former Overland Park police officer who fatally shot 17-year-old John Albers as he backed out of his driveway in January 2018 was paid $70,000 as part of a deal to resign.

The city confirmed Tuesday that it negotiated an $81,040 buyout with former Overland Park Police Officer Clayton Jenison — which included $70,000 in severance pay and $11,040 owed for his regular salary ($8,000), compensation time ($2,354) and unused vacation and holiday pay ($686).

The separation agreement came despite the fact the police department and prosecutor's office found nothing wrong with Jenison's conduct.

After a review that was never made public by the Johnson County Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Team, Jenison was cleared of any wrongdoing by Johnson County District Attorney Steve Howe and Overland Park Police Chief Frank Donchez.

Sheila Albers called Donchez's comments "false" in an interview Tuesday. She also pointed out there was no mention of any payout for Jenison at that time and said the entire process surrounding her son's fatal shooting lacked transparency.

"The dollars and the data speak for themselves, and I'm stunned," Sheila Albers said. "This was protecting a police officer at all costs, and those costs also mean the lack of truth. This was, in my opinion, a complete abuse of power."

The Albers family won a wrongful death settlement in the case. Judge Daniel Crabtree, a U.S. District Court judge for the District of Kansas, ruled that Jenison was never in the path of Albers' vehicle and did not act reasonably in opening fire on the Blue Valley Northwest student.

An expert the family hired for the lawsuit determined John Albers was backing out of the driveway at 2 1/2 mph when Jenison shot at the vehicle 13 times and killed him.

https://www.kshb.com/news/local-news/investigations/overland-park-paid-former-police-officer-who-fatally-shot-teen-to-resign

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4942 on: July 04, 2020, 11:02:19 AM »
How odd, one moment the bodycam video shows a young (white) man being tazed, then all of a sudden he has been shot dead. As expected, the 26 seconds that contain the shooting are conveniently missing.

Video shows park ranger shoot and kill unarmed Carlsbad Caverns visitor

Recently released videos from a body-camera worn by a National Park Ranger at Carlsbad Caverns National Park reveals the park visitor who he tased, then shot and killed did not provoke the use of force and was unarmed.

Charles “Gage” Lorentz was traveling from his work site in Pecos, Texas on March 21. 2020 intending to head to his family’s home in Southwest Colorado.  A report from the Eddy County Sheriff’s Department noted that he detoured at Carlsbad Caverns National Park to meet a friend.  The report states National Park Ranger Robert Mitchell stopped him for speeding on a dirt road near the Rattlesnake Springs area of the park.

The lapel video shows Ranger Mitchell ordered Lorentz to spread his feet and move closer to a railing.  Lorentz is seen complying with those orders.  But when the ranger orders Lorentz to turn around, Lorentz is seen in the video not complying and dancing to nearby music playing from someone’s vehicle.  Ranger Mitchell commanded Lorentz to take his hands out of his pockets, and without warning or an announcement that force will be used; Ranger Mitchell deployed his Taser at Lorentz.

The video abruptly ends when the Taser is deployed.  26 seconds of the video is missing, but when the video resumes, the video shows Ranger Mitchell on top of  Lorentz.  That’s when the ranger shot him twice with his service gun.

Later in the video, Ranger Mitchell is heard explaining what happened during the missing 26 seconds to an Eddy County Deputy.  He said, “that's when I shot him with a Taser.  It did nothing.  I went dry stun, he hit me somewhere right here on the side of my head.  The fight was on, he grabbed me around the neck, he tried to push my head into the push bar and I came up and fired one round.  I don't know if I got him or not, but I definitely got him on the second one and he crumbled.”



https://www.kob.com/albuquerque-guy-shoot-and-kill-unarmed-carlsbad-caverns-visitor/5777672/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4943 on: July 07, 2020, 03:48:30 PM »
An "extraordinary series of bad decisions" is a very mild way to put it.

Chasing a car supposedly for a broken taillight at 99mph (oddly specific velocity, was it more).

Not using sirens or lights during said chase.

Conveniently "forgetting" to turn on the body camera.

Lying and deceiving the woman whose house was damaged.

Lying on the police report.

Trying to cover up the damage he caused on the police car.

This isn't just an "extraordinary series of bad decisions", as the Denver Public Safety director called it. And how many others like him behave like this to varying degrees every day and get away with it?

Of course none of the above seems to be a crime that will be prosecuted since the criminal has a badge. The "harsh" punishment this criminal received is he was fired and the other one got 22 days of unpaid suspension.


“Extraordinary series of bad decisions”: Denver police officer fired for filing false report, covering up car chase

A Denver police officer was fired for “an extraordinary series of bad decisions” that included an unauthorized car chase, failing to turn on his body camera during the chase, failing to notify the department that the chased car crashed into a innocent person’s garage, trying to conceal damage to his own car with white out and lying in his reports in an attempt to cover up the entire incident.

Officer Nicholas Mauro “so significantly violated the public trust that the only appropriate penalty for this rule violation is termination,” Deputy Director of Denver Public Safety Mary Dulacki wrote in Mauro’s discipline letter.

Another officer, Aldo Salayandia, will serve a 22-day unpaid suspension for participating in the chase, failing to intervene in Mauro’s misconduct and failing to report the misconduct to a supervisor.

Mauro was working patrol on Nov. 19, 2019, when he saw an SUV with a broken tail light get on Interstate 70. He followed the SUV as it exited onto Havana Street and continued to match its speed, at one point reaching 99 mph. He did not turn on his lights or siren.

Mauro then called Salayandia, who was nearby, and told the officer to look for the SUV as it traveled down East 56th Avenue. Salayandia followed the SUV as well, until it crashed into the garage door of a home on Laredo Street. Both officers approached the SUV, but nobody was inside. Mauro reached into the SUV to turn it off, but the SUV instead reversed down the driveway and struck Mauro’s car.

That’s when the lying began.

The homeowner told the officers she didn’t own or recognize the car. Mauro later told the woman via text to file an accident report online, even though policy mandated that he should take a report himself.

Mauro then logged a false report that he simply found the vehicle damaged on the side of the road, several blocks from the woman’s house. He also logged a request that the vehicle be towed from the scene, not mentioning the chase, the crash or the damage to the woman’s house or his own patrol car.

When he returned to the police station, he covered up damage to his car with white out, according to the disciplinary letter.


The woman tried to file a report online, but wasn’t able to so she called dispatch and a corporal came to take her statement and watch video of the incident she retrieved from her doorbell camera. During his follow-up, the corporal found that Mauro lied in his report, failed to report the SUV crashing into the garage and failed to report the accident regarding his own patrol car.

In an interview with internal affairs, Salayandia said he should have taken the lead on the situation, even though he had one less year on the force than Mauro. Salayandia joined the department in 2016 and Mauro joined in 2015.

Mauro, in his interview with internal affairs, acknowledged that he made bad decisions and that he lied to avoid consequences.

“Officer Mauro said he started to panic and that he was scared because he knew the repercussions of what had happened,” the letter states.

Mauro said that he did not activate his body camera because he didn’t want it to show him pursuing the vehicle. He said he told the homeowner that the license plate on the SUV was fake because he didn’t want her to include the plate number in her online report, as it might connect the crash to his false report. He said he lied about finding the damaged SUV because he “feared repercussions.”

Dulacki found that Mauro violated the department’s policy by chasing a vehicle for a traffic violation, failing to file required reports and lying about the entire situation in the reports he did file.

“The totality of these actions and decisions is appalling,” Dulacki wrote in Mauro’s discipline letter.

https://www.denverpost.com/2020/07/07/denver-police-officer-fired-nicholas-mauro/

Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4944 on: July 07, 2020, 09:48:52 PM »
Fairmont cop drove twice the speed limit in a fatal crash. He won't be charged.

A police officer whose family politically supports Marion County’s top prosecutor won’t face charges after driving twice the speed limit in a crash that killed an elderly man.

Jakob Streyle was traveling more than 70 mph in a marked 2016 Dodge Ram pickup in July 2019 when he T-boned the truck into an SUV driven by Steven Gene Santini, 72, who was killed a block away from the home, where he had lived with his wife, Emily, for 15 years.

Streyle was not operating the police pickup’s emergency lights or sirens, nor was he responding to a call, civil court documents showed.

Fairmont police neither disciplined Streyle nor responded to a request for comment.

https://www.wvgazettemail.com/news/fairmont-cop-drove-twice-the-speed-limit-in-a-fatal-crash-he-wont-be-charged/article_5402bcec-c7db-5946-ab23-6bf53795ac23.html


Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4946 on: July 10, 2020, 11:28:29 AM »
https://abc7ny.com/arrest-made-after-daughter-investigates-dads-murder-herself/6308024/?fbclid=IwAR3ukhnlOILbYiYR99-ym7QnF3HCNVB0S0jv5Pex9Kj2lYqwCAO10B1FWoU


 :( >:(

Crazy. This is their job (aside from the "protect and serve" BS), getting paid by the taxpayers and they don't even give a fuck.

Quote
Espinal said police at the 103 Precinct refused to investigate what happened to her dad. When the lieutenant there refused to write up a police report, he told Espinal that she should go out into the neighborhood, and find her own evidence of a crime -- and so she did.


Skeletor

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4948 on: July 10, 2020, 12:57:21 PM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/crime-courts/three-lapd-officers-face-felony-charges-falsely-labeling-people-gang-n1233412?fbclid=IwAR3sguSXy1ScIi6U_ZmuqWFr7O_jANSoZaFhw-W6Q5DDZS_aazP6xrrfsFw


Geezus

Damn, talk about a criminal gang:

Quote
According to a 59-count criminal complaint, the three were charged with conspiracy, filing false reports, and preparing fraudulent documents for court. It was not immediately clear how many of each of the charges applied to each officer.

The three defendants are accused of falsifying cards used by officers to conduct interviews while in the field.

In some instances, the defendants allegedly wrote on the card that a person admitted to being a gang member even though body-worn camera video showed the defendants never asked the individual about gang membership, prosecutors said.

In other instances, the defendants allegedly wrote that a person admitted to being a gang member though the person had denied gang affiliation.

Shaw is accused of falsifying 43 field interview cards. Coblentz is accused of falsifying seven cards and Martinez is accused of falsifying two cards.

If convicted, Shaw faces up to 31 years and eight months in county jail, while Coblentz faces up to seven years and eight months and Martinez faces up to four years and four months.

Alas, it is unlikely they will serve these prison sentences. Probably they'll get a sweet plea deal with probation.

Soul Crusher

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Re: Police State - Official Thread
« Reply #4949 on: July 10, 2020, 01:00:19 PM »
Damn, talk about a criminal gang:

Alas, it is unlikely they will serve these prison sentences. Probably they'll get a sweet plea deal with probation.

In some instances, the defendants allegedly wrote on the card that a person admitted to being a gang member even though body-worn camera video showed the defendants never asked the individual about gang membership, prosecutors said.



Unbelievable