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Author Topic: are deadlifts overrated?  (Read 10565 times)
will938
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« Reply #50 on: September 14, 2005, 11:03:38 PM »

gO BACK TO mAYHEM YOU weakling.

Everyone knows I can back up what I say.

What can you do besides being head fluffer for Massive G and company?

Everyone knows you can back up what you say?? do you really believe that you sad little prick?  and as for weakling, Anus, if we ever met you would find that not to be the case Wink
Now go and find yourself a nice little poetry board or something where you can go and bore the arse off them instead, oh and BTW, I was on here before you and didn't need to come here just because I was banned from Mayhem.
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Nathan
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« Reply #51 on: September 20, 2005, 09:42:28 PM »

Huh Deads are a key exercise no matter wich way you cut it.
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Eulogy
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« Reply #52 on: September 20, 2005, 11:27:20 PM »

Personally, I think and feel that deadlifts are the best overall back exercise, especially for the lower back. I typically do 3 sets of light warmups sets to 'positive failure' (no forced reps, just stopping at earnest muscle fatigue). Then typically it's on to 4 heavy sets of 4 to 6 reps with a weight that induces positive muscle failure between reps 4 thru 6 on week 1 and 3. On weeks 2 and 4, I go lighter and for higher reps, generally 4 sets of 12 to 15 reps - just so I don't strain myself too much and cause a possible injury. This switch-up is because ... well, deadlifts are a taxing exercise on your body, but when performed properly, and intelligently, are also the zenith of back-attack exercises.  I don't want an injury, and I'm not in it for the ego.

Add a good mixture of pull-ups, chins, and bent-over rows for a solid overall back workout. The problem I find with most people and their back-related problems (minus any actual physical ailment) is what I refer to as 'the phobia'- and that is caused because people don't know how to properly work within their limits. Your ego must be left at the door if you want to have a safe and productive deadlift regiment (or any other exercise/workout routine for that matter).  Your whole body, back especially will grow more from feel, and a full muscle contraction from each rep than an additional 100, 50, 25, or even 10 pounds.

Remember that posture during the deadlift is key. Keep your legs shoulder-width apart, feet evenly spaced and facing forward. Rest on the heels of your feet, they are your foundation. Bow your knees slightly, and keep your back straight and at what your body feels to be its perfect angle, look down when you place your grip and ensure it's how you prefer to do the 'lift. Realign your head with the angle of your back, looking forward, even slightly upward. Focus yourself, and then pull. Keep your body tensed, muscles susceptible to use, and always keeping your back properly aligned. Do not slouch, keep your shoulder-blades near if not fully pinched as you raise the bar; use your legs as a backing, but try not to roll them up your shins. Always lockout and return the weight safely in a reverse motion. As I said before, I prefer not to go to negative failure or forced reps, this is where most deadlift-related strains occur in my opinion.  My personal preference is an over-hand, under-hand grip; I switch it up between a thumbs in and thumbs out every other set - just to alter the feel of the deadlift and 'shocking' your body some. Remember - a deadlift works nearly every muscle, allow for the incorporation of other muscle groups - not necessarily to increase the poundages you're lifting - but to enhance the actual exercise and your body's response.

I don't use straps on deadlifts, and that too is a personal choice. If you decide that you want to try and isolate your back that much more, that's cool too and straps provide a good alternative to freeform lifting. Just remember that it's always better to have a complete, functional and balanced body in terms of conditioning (health-wise, not contest cond.), strength and size. The workout to my forearms, noticeable size gains as well as hands/grip strength from incorporating deadlifts into my back routine is amazing and also beneficial to my workout goals.

In the end, yes you can use a variety of different exercises to work your back and make it grow. Yes your back will grow from a routine that does not include deadlifts; but why avoid one of the best compound exercises there is? Lose the ego, lose the fear - the phobia and just go for it.

... Anyways, that's my late-night 2 cents.

P.S.: Your lower back will never be as complete - as thick or as full - if you do not deadlift, and that's the truth.

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young guns
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« Reply #53 on: September 21, 2005, 02:19:17 AM »

no.
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pumpster
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« Reply #54 on: September 21, 2005, 03:56:17 AM »

Completely over-rated, especially by some on this site, but a NICE way to blow out your back. For those who like it don't assume that the rest of us need this shyte as a master mass builder for every possible bodypart, and then keep reminding of this need over and over again like a broken record. Definitely not a fundamental exercise and not a great mass builder; there are better overall exercises such as squats or clean n' jerks, that work the body better, crreate more athleticism, and are less stressful.

When was the last time someone complemented a top builder on his lower back development? If that's a factor, there are many other less stressful ways to hit that area. If i need an overall builder, cleans, clean n' jerks or squats are far better overall, and are less stressful.
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big E
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« Reply #55 on: September 21, 2005, 06:32:39 AM »

1/4 and 1/2 deads work better for me at adding thickness to my lats, with an overhand grip.
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Thaiboxing,Bjj
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« Reply #56 on: September 21, 2005, 04:56:49 PM »

The only way to develop any muscle in the body is to exercise it according to its function in the body.

Bent over rows are a form of a static contraction as far as the lumbar spine is concerned.

While static contractions (isometric contractions) are a form of strength building, they produce strength and possibly some size while in a static contraction.

For complete development and full range-of-motion strength, a static contraction only in one angle is inferior to full range movements.

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young guns
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« Reply #57 on: September 21, 2005, 05:29:20 PM »

Completely over-rated, especially by some on this site, but a NICE way to blow out your back. For those who like it don't assume that the rest of us need this shyte as a master mass builder for every possible bodypart, and then keep reminding of this need over and over again like a broken record. Definitely not a fundamental exercise and not a great mass builder; there are better overall exercises such as squats or clean n' jerks, that work the body better, crreate more athleticism, and are less stressful.

When was the last time someone complemented a top builder on his lower back development? If that's a factor, there are many other less stressful ways to hit that area. If i need an overall builder, cleans, clean n' jerks or squats are far better overall, and are less stressful.


i bet your just bitter..due to not breaking that ever elusive 300lb mark...lol..
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Ahmster
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« Reply #58 on: September 21, 2005, 05:55:31 PM »

for a taller bodybuilder like myself at 6'2" good leg size was only achievable once i could FULL squat 405lbs+ for reps. I'm natural and always have been so that probably won't sound like much for juicers, but for a natural guy it is not easy. in order to do that and not have lower back issues i need to either do deadlifts (405lbs+ for reps) or good mornings (225lbs+ for reps) every week. for shorterguys it may not be that important, but deads of good mornings are very important for taller guys.
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Bear03
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back in the swing of things


« Reply #59 on: September 22, 2005, 07:36:12 AM »

I didn't see many results from incessant chinning until i started doing deadlifts, at which point i went from being able to do 6-7 unweighted chins to being able to do 8 with 35 lbs in a matter of weeks, it seems. 
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:-)
Ledd
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« Reply #60 on: September 24, 2005, 03:55:37 PM »

Hi....my name is Ledd and.....and......um..... ...well................. ....I still dont know how EXACTLY to do a proper deadlift.
There fine I said it ok! Cry
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Cold
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« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2005, 06:10:28 AM »

I was a HUGE deadlift fan for years. I loved doing it. The past year or so I cut it out because of back pain, and to be honest with you, i don't think i missed a beat. My back still looks just as good as before.
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KSA
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« Reply #62 on: October 16, 2005, 10:25:48 AM »

Gee gollies, shouldn't this thread be over on the "Training Q & A" forum?

Anyway, no I don't think deadlifts (dl/dls) are overrated!  As a matter-of-fact, IMO the diamond, or hex-bar, dl is arguably the safest and best single muscle mass-building compound exercise in existence!?

The diamond bar allows you to start the dl in a very low top-of-thighs-parallel-to-floor (or even below parallel!) position, and allows you to pull the bar straight-up and back over your heels (a so much safer "bar path" than the straight-bar dl)!!  Why, you can even finish off each rep., in the diamond-bar dl, with an effective shrug!

The diamond bar dl actually allows you to combine practically ALL the benefits of BOTH the straight-bar back squat AND the straight-bar dl movements into a SINGLE highly-effective mass-building compound movement (e.g. arguably better than even the breathing back squat for say high reps)!?

The big danger (of course!) with the straight-bar dl is that one has to invariably round their low back with heavy weights, to a greater extent, when clearing their knees.  As we all should know, legions-upon-legions of weight-trainers have injured their lower backs attemping PR dls, or struggling to complete those "last few reps."!! 

Sure, we all know we should all keep our backs "flat" when we dl, however most of us "slip-up" and round our back for those last few reps., or that PR attempt!  And when we do (or when we set the bar down!), we feel that "uhh-oh!" twinge of pain in our lower back!

Of course, some trainees have "low backs of iron" and never experience lower back problems doing straight-bar dls!  But sadly, most of us find out the hard way (!) that we are not a member of the "low-backs-of-iron" fraternity!!

All I'm saying is that the diamond-bar dl arguably works the muscles of the thighs, glutes, hips, lower back, and traps, more thoroughly (and much more safely!) than either the straight-bar back squat or the straight-bar dl!?  In high-reps., the diamond-bar dl is a great muscle mass, and stamina, builder!!

The diamond-bar dl is certainly a candidate for the title "greatest single compound exercise"...surpassing even the sacrosanct back squat!?  This is because it concurrently works more large muscle groups, and provides greater low back and knee protection, than does the barbell back squat!

I agree .I have a trap/shrug bar and i love it !
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Bear726
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« Reply #63 on: October 18, 2005, 06:33:27 AM »

I couldn't have said it any better.  I myself am not a member of the, "low-backs-of-iron" fraternity.  I pledged, but was kicked out because I am too much of a puss. Wink

Seriously though, at 20 years old I could deadlift all day.  At 25 I would start to spasim out with heavy deads, and at 30 if I even try to go heavy on deads at all I might as well get the hot water running in the bath because my back will be so sore and tight that I can barely walk.  As a non-competitive lifter it is not worth it for me. 

For those of you that can deadlift heavy, good for you.  I wish I could as I love the feeling of pulling 500+lbs off the floor, but my body just can't handle that weight any longer naturally.   
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Carmello
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« Reply #64 on: October 30, 2005, 02:17:54 PM »

Deadlifts are great! I've gotten the best results from them, more than any other single excercise, but don't do partial deads, i tried it once, and had a knot in my lower back for a few days. It could be cause i'm 6'2'' just be careful on partials anyway.
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CEA999
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« Reply #65 on: October 30, 2005, 02:36:00 PM »

how do you know when your CNS is burned out? What are the symptoms of CNS burnout?
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